DCT issues real? See vid and comment plz

Discussion in 'New Riders' started by Urgoros, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. Urgoros

    Urgoros New Member

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    Hello everyone, I’m a prospective new vfr rider who saw this video and has a lot of questions:

    At 4:04 the pertinent info begins. The part that most alarms me is how he says the dct is bad at downshifting in a curve. Is that all the time or only when you’re hitting a curve at speed and thus the computer doesn’t detect a need to downshift because you didn’t slow down enough?

    They mention using manual to dwnshft, then they updated the cpu to go back to auto mode. On what models did they do the updates that are mentioned? 2012 and 2013? Is there a diff btw the 2013 and ‘12 besides paint job? If you own a 2010 dct, can you take it in to Honda for a free update or do you buy a later model? Ergo, is it smartest to buy a 2012 or ‘13 model and leave the buggy 2010’s on the shelf?

    I completed MSF , I’m not a squid, I respect the machine and I thought the vfr dct may be okay for a first bike bc of the semi-auto transmission “holding my hand” even though this is a big liter bike which would normally be bad to start with. I also read that the throttle isn’t hyper-responsive even on manual like a race bike’s is.

    Could the VFR1200DCT be a conservative responsible noob rider’s first bike then or no? I trained on a 300cc and 380lbs. Do I have to suck it up and get a starter 300cc bike and ride for a year then upgrade? Will my skills be that much different assuming I parking lot practice and early morning ride anyway? If I don’t get this I’ll get the Yamaha R3, but I don’t like manual transmissions for response time in emergency situations. Pushing one thumb button and braking and evading is much easier and faster than squeezing a lever and foot pumping a shifter down plus everything else that has to happen under pressure.
     
  2. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Hi Urgoros and welcome to the Forum


    As for choosing your own first large motorbike I think you need to try and break down the selection process as there is an immense variety of types and sizes of motorbikes available from dozens of manufacturers.

    If you are seriously considering a VFR1200F DCT as your first ever bike, then I suggest you try and take one for a test drive before you commit to buying one. Likewise try out the Yamaha R3. When it comes to deciding what you should buy, only you can make that choice. Some people buy with their head, others their wallet, others their heart.

    Another factor to consider as a new rider, is regardless of what you eventually buy, you will almost certainly drop it, quite probably with friends around to witness. That risk increases for smaller riders and heavier bikes like the VFR with a high centre of gravity. Hence buying a used bike may soften any resulting embarrassment and heartache if you are simply adding a few more battle scars to an already well used bike.

    Good luck - enjoy the search


    SkiMad
     
  3. Urgoros

    Urgoros New Member

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    Thanks for the welcome! I like the beauty of a sport bike design but want a more upright position that a sport tourer gives. The 2017 and ‘18 R3’s have the sport touring stance which is great, but they have chain drives which I’m not looking forward to cleaning (one more thing to do) and no dct. I believe in the intelligence of the dct for a motorcycle. I wish there was a dct offering on a lighter bike like an 800 or less that had a sport/sport tour aesthetic, but until that day the VFR1200 is it.

    I’m 180lbs and 6ft tall, and sat on a vfr 1200 manual transmission bike at the dealership. The height fit was good for me. I felt the weight and wheelbase difference. Did not test ride bc it’s a manual and want the dct experience to fully evaluate the bike. Plus the bike doing work for me via dct makes me feel safer starting on a bigger bike.

    It looks like from your pic that you’re riding an 800 interceptor. How is its throttle response?

    I’d like to test ride the 1200 too, but finding one in my home city is hard. I may have to bite the bullet and fly somewhere to try it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
  4. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy New Member

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    tiered licsnsing saves lives.
     
  5. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    Hi & welcome,

    Please do not take this piece of advice the wrong way but if you honestly think that having a 180mph, 0-60 in under 3 seconds, as your first bike to hone your skills on, is a good idea then sadly I do not believe you will be a member on here long.
     
  6. marriedman

    marriedman New Member

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    The VFR1200 is a wonderful bike, but it is not a beginner bike. You may be conservative and reserved, but you are inexperienced. The power of the 1200 is incredible, it would be safe to assume that you would have an "oh shit" moment very quickly. A lighter bike would be a very wise decision. Not to mention they are fun as hell to ride.

    I also suggest mastering manual shifting. It's all a part of the experience. But if you really want DCT, look at the NC700 or 750:

    https://www.cycletrader.com/listing/2018-Honda-NC750X-DCT-5002883214



    Sent from my phone. Please forgive brevity and spelling.
     
    skimad4x4 likes this.
  7. Urgoros

    Urgoros New Member

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    Alright, I’ll go with saving the VFR for the future. I’ll test ride a NC700. Though it seems most people think 700 is still too much for noobs. Again, is it too much to handle even when the DCT automatic is in use? The throttle response is easier to handle then, right?

    Btw, I’m still interested in hearing about vfr dct riders’ experiences per my original questions.
     
  8. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    ok, lets be clear.

    The VFR1200 is basically a bike version of a DODGE VIPER. - power everywhere & brutal if you are ham fisted with the throttle.

    The NC700 is like a standard Dodge Camero - plenty of power but more forgiving to a rider.

    These are NOT really perfect first bike choices....

    The NC700 at 50ish hp has more than enough to get you into plenty of trouble -VFR1200 @ 150+hp is rediculous.

    What do you want this bike to do ?
    Why are you buying it ?
    Is it just for you or are you having a pillion?

    Having an automatic gearbox on a bike REMOVES an element of CONTROL this is sometimes required.
     
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