Installation of steel braided brake lines

Discussion in '5th Generation 1998-2001' started by sinc5959, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. sinc5959

    sinc5959 New Member

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  2. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy New Member

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    Not for someone who doesn't have at least average mechanical skill and know how. It's an involved process. By average skill, I don't mean you can do an oil change.

    Don't let someone try to tell you that it's "easy", the reality is it isn't. Draining, removing old and routing new brakelines takes time. The bleeding process requires a good vacuum bleeder, and knowledge of linked brakes and the correct bleeding sequence.

    If you still insist upon doing it, look into HEL lines.




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    smack doogle likes this.
  3. tinkerinWstuff

    tinkerinWstuff Administrator Staff Member

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    With all the rubber lines in the linked brake system, I wouldn't be surprised if there's a big difference even for the average rider. I'll be interested to hear what you think if you go ahead with it.
     
  4. sinc5959

    sinc5959 New Member

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    I replaced the timing belt in my son's '86 300ZX a couple of years ago so I would say if 'average skill' is doing an oil change I have more than average. That said, when it comes to motorcycles I've only ever done the basics eg. replace windscreen, replace light bulb, change the oil, adjust the chain. Never touched the brakes and would not want screw things up in this area...I need to be able to stop when required!

    Thanks for the feedback.
     
  5. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy New Member

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    Compare the two kits, Galfer and HEL....the HEL ines have all stock type connections, the Galfer kit uses T's and other non stock connections to hook everything up. The Galfer kit has caused more than one person a problem around here.

    If you want the hypersport lever feel and stopping power, you are going to have to nut up and get the lines.



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  6. tinkerinWstuff

    tinkerinWstuff Administrator Staff Member

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    If you wouldn't be apprehensive about changing out all the brake lines on your car, then you could probably handle it on the bike.

    Key, like NCB said, is researching the proper bleeding procedure for the linked brake system on the 5th gen. My understanding is that a good vacuum pump is required and not just recommended.
     
  7. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy New Member

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    There is more to it than just the bleeding process, you will have to take half the bike apart to get them routed correctly. One drop of brake fluid on any visible plastic or painted surface will make you wish you didn't skimp and try to short cut around taking half the bike apart before you can even start.

    The small tubing line connections are also points that can be a problem.
     
  8. stoshmonster

    stoshmonster New Member

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  9. sinc5959

    sinc5959 New Member

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    Hmmm, I think I might just get this work done at a shop, looks complicated. I started thinking on the braided lines because the braking power on the VFR just isn't what I was used to on my last bike (BMW K1200R), mind you I believe that bike had the braided lines.

    Not only do these brakes seem somewhat ineffective compared to the BMW, I've also noticed the braking is not smooth, the brakes grab relatively hard and then not so hard, relatively hard, not so hard, perhaps the rotor is warped, or is this typical braking with these bikes... Bike has 29000 KM on it. I had a 93 VFR years ago and I don't remember the brakes feeling like that.

    I will look at the HEL, the cost relative to the Galfer or whatever doesn't really concern me, I only paid $4K for the bike so I don't mind spending some $ on it. I'm thinking about a set of Ohlins after this...
     
  10. tinkerinWstuff

    tinkerinWstuff Administrator Staff Member

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    may be glazing on the rotor. take some emery cloth and scuff up both sides of all three rotors and see if it smooths out.
     
  11. vfourbear

    vfourbear New Member

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    That is how I felt about the upgrade.... I did not find the bleed procedure to be incomprehensible, so I gave it a try. The brakes still feel great today. There's really no getting around the fact that OEM rubber hoses lose something with age.
     
  12. TOE CUTTER

    TOE CUTTER Mullet Man

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    Not a fan of the steel lines and unless it is necessary I would leave that dog alone for all the reasons previously stated.
     
  13. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    I go for braided lines on all my bikes all the time, but then again I never owned one of the newer ones with multiple lines along with linked features and ABS thrown in there. Makes a huge difference, nice two finger stops, and excellent modulation.

    To do a brake service on a BMW it was a literal pain in dah arse, to the point where you wanted to look at your notes as there was a sequence for bleeding. Not to mention the test at the end where you hooked the bike up a propriortery machine where it cycled the ABS system. And people talk about the Japanese over-engineering shit. And no matter what, and I repeat no matter what, the master cylinder covers always weeped brake fluid.

    I used my air assisted bleeder today hooked up to the clutch slave as I was re-building the master and installed a new slave. I had a boner literally, what used to be a 20 minute bleed job turned into a 5 minute one. I had this tool for a long time and never really bothered using it. I saw dah light.
     
  14. mickeymike

    mickeymike New Member

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    I changed all my lines to Galfer stainless lines 2 years ago. The lines came without directions, but Galfer had directions on-line. There are 13 lines and it is a lot of work. I kept track of the time and it took over 20 hours to get everything working. Bleeding the lines was a real pain. It is very difficult to get all the air out even with a mity-vac and following the correct sequence per the shop manual. But they do transform the bike and I recommend it if you are willing to take the time. I have since added wave rotors and the overall performance is substantially better. It is now like a sport bike instead of a cruiser!
     
  15. CaptGarvin

    CaptGarvin New Member

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    Had similar problem, suspect mechanic installing front tire put pressure on the rotor removing tire. Was barely noticeable but new rotors and pads are now silky smooth. Installing Galfer 10 pc braided lines this week, but replacements are not matching in lengths (2002 non abs vfr) Have shop manual but need more from Galfer
     
  16. FJ12rydertoo

    FJ12rydertoo New Member

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    I love the steel lines, but one should definitely take his time and make sure he thoroughly understands
    all the steps before he starts. And IMO adding Speedbleeders while you have it apart is a worthwhile
    addition to the bike.
     
  17. HellFishTat

    HellFishTat New Member

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    Word. I made the mistake my brother warned me about when I was installing a set of Spiegler's on my '98...take one line off, and install the new. One of our friends was there and we were drinking (shocker) and before I knew it, I had removed 4 of the 13 without installing any of the new ones. Huge mistake.

    This was the 3rd motorcycle I had put Spiegler's on, I really think 20 year old bikes need new brake lines, and it too me MUCH longer than I, or my brother (who's garage and tools I was borrowing) wanted it to.

    Slow and steady wins the race.
     
  18. OOTV

    OOTV Member

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    Note that speed bleeders are great once the lines are filled. Trying to vacuum the fluid through the line with SBs on doesn't work too well.
     
  19. FJ12rydertoo

    FJ12rydertoo New Member

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    Honestly, I never had much luck with the MityVac. I always got air leaking past the threads of the bleeders.
    If you could keep the threads sealed it worked fine, but it seemed like more leaked than didn't. And taping
    the threads was more of a headache than just doing the old pump-and-hold. :)
     
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