Poory Moto Sickers

Discussion in '6th Generation 2002-2013' started by A.M, Apr 11, 2018.

  1. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Calling it a night...

    I can't video while I work, but thought I could video document. Something new I've been trying to do more of, but I'm old...stuck in the era of taking photos in my forefront of thought...not videoing.

     
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  2. Jeff_Barrett

    Jeff_Barrett Member

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    'Bout time you finally dug into that front clip - I always suspected that's where the problems were.

    Good catch / find on that temp sensor - that's a real good start to hopefully solving your woes. Good to see you have a safe dry place to work in as well - congrats!
     
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  3. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Does anyone here have knowledge of how that air temp sensor works?

    I cannot sleep over this, it's bugging me. Obviously the leads are screwed in. The screws making contact with something inside I'm guessing. But what? And temp readings wouldn't get transmitted by leads.

    I'm stumped. Baffled. Bewildered by this Bewildering Bewilderment.
     
  4. Jeff_Barrett

    Jeff_Barrett Member

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    Not sleeping well here either due to an upset stomach.

    Are you referring to how it actually works? It really depends on what type of sensor they used - a thermocouple for example, uses two different metals that generate an electrical charge. This charge changes depending on the ambient temperature. This voltage is then measured and referenced with a temperature.

    In addition to thermocouples, there's RTDs, thermistors, IR and semiconductor sensors ... they all work somewhat differently yet similar in the sense that a voltage is being read, and related to a specific temperature ....

    I don't know the detailed specifics of each one, but here's a good read that seems to do a fairly decent job of explaining: https://www.elprocus.com/temperature-sensors-types-working-operation/
     
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  5. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep, referring to how it actually works. Thank you for this article! I'm going to have to read it again when I'm not Delirious from lack of sleep.

    This has got to be an explanation for how it works though, with the temp sensor on this Moto. Surely the screws are making contact inside, and the readings are converted into a temp.

    Maybe that's why on my 16-hour Arctic night ride, the temperature stop reading because maybe the leads were so frozen to relay anything? I don't know. But interesting.

    Hope the ache goes away. No bueno!
     
  6. Jeff_Barrett

    Jeff_Barrett Member

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    Your very welcome. Yes, I do believe it explains how each works in the article.

    As for the gauge on our VFRs, I think mine quits below a certain temperature as well.
     
  7. VFR4Lee

    VFR4Lee New Member

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    Wow, you are really in pretty deep AM.
    If you got this far you can finish the job, and the oil and filter job is Duck Soup. :Hippie:
     
  8. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    So today I did some soldering. My flux is crappy so I ordered SRA 135. That should come soon. But still got the knack I think. Here is a sample. Let me know if you see any place for tips. It's not the best, but not the worst. I'm not happy with my 60 W Wellers ... timed it... took 6.5 minutes to heat up the wire before solder would start to seep. Burnt up my flux waiting each time.

    20180416_191311.jpg

    However, on the 22 gauge (estimating) sensor wire, heating that up took no time at all compared to the 14 I was fiddling with. But I am not sure I did such a great job.
    I butt connected the damaged wires previously found. But when inspecting the other side closer, I found this:

    20180416_172045.jpg
    Not much at all to work woth but soldered the connections and wrapped it up. I'm very reluctant the unit will work or that my solder on such fine wire...that kept breaking will do the job. The two halves of that sensor equal a pretty penny. So hoping it works and doesn't catch on fore from still fusing some wires with short strands. :/

    Very tired tonight and brain dead so calling it quits early. Made a couple videos. One I'm super feeling smiley about, which is needed after long day.

    But here's a short one... temp sensor woes. I let myself be disappointed, but what do you do but say oh well and keep on keeping on.



    I got inside to take a bath. Walked around for 10 minutes with my safety glasses still on my face. :/
    Do I need wine? Or do I need sleepies?
     
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  9. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Sooo...thanks to Bill and Jack and all friends who recommended this part which gives me much confidence in it...especially coming from Bill...

    I was able to unwrap and essential piece to solving this problem today.

    This be dedicated to Bill and all of you. This may not be a ride, like my traditional ones on the road, but this is definitely one too. Just a different kind of ride. I'm grateful for your help and encouragements. <3

    Also...my garage smells heavenly.
    And I promise I didn't huff too much solder fumes.

     
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  10. OOTV

    OOTV Active Member

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    The soldering looks good but I would recommend that you strip back the wire sheathing as minimally as possible, especially if you need to heat the wire for a long period of time, as the sheathing will sometimes melt and "shrink" back a little leaving more wire exposed. Also make sure the amount of heat shrink is enough to cover the solder joint and overlap the wire sheathing on both ends of the solder joint.
     
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  11. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Thank you for the advices!

    Any tips for cutting back very fine wire? The green one pictured here I just be messing with.

    But the fine wire to the temp sensor...so careful stripping it, not several shortened threads. Nothing to do about it though. I may still take the whole thing apart. Order the correct gauge since the finest so found on hand in town was 16. Then redo everything. Still thinkins...

    Now if only I remember every time to thread heat shrink on before joining joints. Teeheehee
     
  12. OOTV

    OOTV Active Member

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    Other than getting a good set of wire strippers, ones that have different gauge cut outs work well, practicing on scrap wire first is the best way to do it well on the actual wire. Finding spare wire might be the tougher issue ;)

    Also, if you cut a set of wires, don't cut them flush with one another, cut them staggered so that when soldered, the soldered splices don't touch. This is especially useful for wires in tight places.

    As far as putting heat shrink on before soldering, happens to the best of us, all I can say there is, pre-cut all your heat shrink and have it ready to go, keeping it in front of you will while you strip the wires will act as a reminder to put it on before you start soldering.
     
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  13. Jeff_Barrett

    Jeff_Barrett Member

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    I'd be proud of that solder joint.

    Regarding how long it's taking to heat the wire - get yourself a butane mini-torch like the one I have, it will make those larger gauge wires heat up a lot faster than your iron. 60W is perfect for most wires on the bike.

    Stripping back fine wires is a bit of an art - as mentioned - just take your time and get a good pair of wire strippers. There are strippers designed for more delicate / smaller gauges of wires vs. the larger ones. You can pick them up at most electronics supply stores.

    Looking good so far! Great job!
     
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  14. Jeff_Barrett

    Jeff_Barrett Member

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    I also forgot to mention about the heat shrink - I forget it all the time. If I'm feeling lazy and don't want to desolder, put the shrink wrap on, and resolder the connection - I'll use liquid electrical tape. It seals great, but can make a big mess if you're not careful and using it sparingly. LOL. I'll often do a few fine coats rather than one heavy one.
     
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  15. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    The past couple of nights I have slept them away. Extremely slept them away like I'm fighting off some illness. And the last I left Moto was at seized bolts on the tail.

    20180417_184757.jpg

    So tonight I handled those with some liquid wrench and all the force I could muster without knocking the Moto off center stand.

    20180420_202441.jpg

    Before I did that though I took the rear wheel off to avoid some slick rubbers. I put a little bucket underneath so liquid wrench wouldn't drip onto the disc. After the unseizing, I took the chain guard off and boy was that disgusting. It was way more nazdee than what this photo shows.

    20180420_205326.jpg

    One of the plastic clips on the guard, the Devil's Legos, came out just as it should. The other one, closest to the front sprocket, did not. I had more leverage getting at it with my left hand, but that was pretty dumb because I'm not left-handed. I had this in my mind and thought I was keeping my right hand out of the way enough, but I didn't.

    Perfect one:

    20180420_205152.jpg

    Trap one:

    20180420_205059.jpg

    I got that mess cleaned up that at least I felt successful getting that off and happy that I could start cleaning some parts.

    I made a bath in the tub. Hot water and Dawn dish soap. A regular sponge, a sponge with some netting on it, and a toothbrush. Even though my Plastics are pretty banged up, they were definitely much more cleaner after I was finished.

    20180420_225821.jpg

    Washing motorcycle parts to Metallica is the perfect scrubbing rhythm, just in case you ever need to do this in the future.

    I'm still waiting on the stator to arrive. So until then I'll just keep cleaning. And trying not to stab myself.

     
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  16. OOTV

    OOTV Active Member

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    AM, if you don’t have to change out the fork seals, replacing the oil isn’t that hard. So easy, even Long and I can do it!

    Still, changing the fork seals is also not that difficult but can be intimidating to some, however I think you could conquer it! Go to VFRDiscussion and look for the Racetech Suspension Bible in the downloads section, it details the process as well as list what tools you might need. There are also countless videos on YouTube on how to do it.

    If you just want to change the oil, not much to it other than taking the top cap off and removing the spring and spacer. A little more time consuming to clean it out if you don’t take them apart but still feasible. Just need to make sure you have enough fork oil for both tubes. If you don’t have a fork oil level gizmo, a turkey baster will do the trick.
     
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  17. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Soon-to-be so easy even Long and you and me can do it? Teeheehee

    Very fitting for you to post the reply and very helpful as well. Thank you!

    I've spent the majority of the morning reading and watching videos on the process. I'm still not sold on being successful, but I feel it's worth a try. I'm nervous. But because I've never attempted anything like it ever, then again most stuff I'm doing is new now.

    I planned on removing the forks completely and thought it prudent to inspect the bushings and give it a good clean anyhoo.

    There are absolutely no signs of leaks anywhere, which is to my amazement as moto stopped humming last week at 53,200 miles.

    Seals and oil have never been done while I've owned moto. :/ But while I'm in there...


    I'll give that document a good look through. Thank you for suggesting the resource and your vote of confidence in how easy it could be.
     
  18. Jeff_Barrett

    Jeff_Barrett Member

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    You've got this ... fork oil is pretty darn simple. Just takes some time getting the forks off the bike ... just be careful with the bolt at the bottom of the fork. Some people have a hard time with it. Fork seals really only need to be done if the current ones are leaking, but for the cost of them and as you said, if you're already doing the oil ... it's good peace of mind.

    While you have the bike down this far, why not do a reverse flush on the radiator and replace the fluids in it? I'll be doing mine in a few weeks. You don't have to take the bike apart for this, but it'll be even easier since everything is off the bike now.

    I was going to do my forks as well, but I'm probably going to wait as I think I'm going to "spring" (get it?? see what I did there??) for some DMr upgrade cartridge kits and a new rear shock.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018 at 10:43 AM
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  19. mello dude

    mello dude Member

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    Hey AM... Above is a very crazy/dangerous phase quite a few of us wrenching fooles think while working on bikes. And like you, the thought often results in a fully torn down bike. (I'm very guilty, "oh sheet, I did it again"...)

    -- I am a bit blown away or I like the British word "gobsmacked" on how for a first timer you have stripped down your ride thus far. You def have some cajones....
    This thread has turned into a silly daily curiosity, gotta check it -- "what happens next?"

    Bit of a tip if you havent already, baggies are your friend in keeping different bolts organized.. stick 'em in a bag and then also write on a scrap of paper what they are from. This helps quite a bit when you start to put it back together. (the hard part)

    Good luck!!!
     
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  20. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Haha...just went on search of old cord to tie up right front caliper...

    More laters, but yeah, tear down continues. Hopefully it doesnt turn into a dreadful curiosity...

    +1 on labeled baggies and lots of photos!!

    20180421_154628.jpg
     
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