'86 VFR750: Two-part Question

Discussion in '1st & 2nd Generation 1983-1989' started by deja vu, Apr 13, 2019.

  1. deja vu

    deja vu New Member

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    Well...I had always wanted a Yoshimura exhaust on my old '86 VFR 750. As fate would have it, I came across a Yoshimura exhaust (4-into-1) for my new (to me) '86 VFR 750. The questions:
    • The new '86 VFR750 has a center stand (as did the old one): Do I have to remove the center stand? On a right hand turn going around the block, I though I heard a dragging sound and the center stand is forced down under the bottom of the exhaust - the stock exhaust didn't do this
    • If I do have to remove the center stand, any thoughts on the tradeoff (between the throatier sound, one less exhaust to clutter the bike vs. removing the center stand)?

    Perhaps if I'm so lucky, a third question: Anyone have experience swapping center stands? Maybe I could use (put) it on the '87 VFR 700? I like the sound of the exhaust...
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
  2. Captain 80s

    Captain 80s Insider

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    The Yosh exhaust prob does not have a stop for the center stand to rest against like the stock muffler. Do you want the exhaust or not? Get a rear stand for maintenance and ditch the center stand. Or come up with a solution for a stop so the stand is not rubbing on the exhaust.
     
  3. deja vu

    deja vu New Member

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    It doesn't have a stop - there's actually a rubber hose on a portion of the spring that hits against the exhaust and will likely melt or be deformed by the heat from the exhaust (it may be Pitbull time). Any thoughts on switching the center stand to the '87 VFR 700? It appears to be compatible with the other bike - I was concerned about the tension on the spring when switching it over...
     
  4. Captain 80s

    Captain 80s Insider

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    It will fit just fine on the 87. If you are inquiring about your mechanical ability to do it... who knows. A spring puller would be good. You can also load up the spring with pennies or nickels then pull them after install.
     
  5. deja vu

    deja vu New Member

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    Indeed it will - it's even the same part number for both bikes. That said, the focus with the '87 is to get that bike running, so playing with the exhaust isn't in the cards (at least for now). The Yoshimura adventure taught me a lot:
    • At least for the '86 VFR750, the Yoshimura exhaust owner has to choose between a center stand and the exhaust (this choice was lost on my 20-something hormone-addled brain)
    • Installation of either the Yoshimura or stock exhaust requires removal of the rear tire - I see no way to avoid this due to the interplay between the hanger angle and the angle of the four header pipes
    • The sequence (technique) to install the stock exhaust is: (1) remove rear wheel, (2) install right half of the exhaust, (3) install left half, starting with the coupler (that joins the two halves) then install the front, (4) reinstall the wheel
    Hopefully this information helps someone who is attempting to do something similar.
     
  6. Brian Rodgers

    Brian Rodgers New Member

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    I have had a Yoshimura on my 750 for 20+ years, though it has not had any hot exhaust in 20 years (I know, "sad"). Is this a NOS Yoshimura exhaust?
    After Hindle came out with their exhaust system, I've been tempted to get same and it looks very similar to the Yoshimura.
    Brian
     
  7. deja vu

    deja vu New Member

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    Brian - the exhaust is older, has some slight surface rust, yet is otherwise in fine shape. The main reason behind this ill-fated adventure was my previous (more than 25 year old) experience with other '86 VFRs that had the Yoshimura exhaust. My previous '86 750 was always stock and now my 'new' one will be as well - at least with respect to the exhaust.

    Some background: I bought an '86 VFR750 brand new and had it for a number of years until I was transferred overseas - I told it with 6,800 miles for $2,300 in 1994. Beginning about 4 years ago, I began looking for one and actually made several offers but wasn't successful. I even picked up a project bike that was more like a basket case and found out I didn't have the time to work on it. Earlier this year, I picked up the '86 VFR750 - turned it into a road trip with my son. The new ride had about 8,700 miles and was in great shape except for some road rash. I chanced upon the Yoshimura exhaust and gave it a whirl, though I'm going back to bone stock.

    Tell me more about your 750...
     
  8. Brian Rodgers

    Brian Rodgers New Member

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    Tell me more about your 750...[/QUOTE]

    I recall the 2-page magazine adds when the '86 VFR750 was introduced and that probably set the hook for me. My ride at the time was an '82 CB750f and I had a single, late-night ride of a race -prepped VF750 a year or so before. Spotted an add for a low-mileage '86 that was owned by a UT fraternity boy who only used the rear brake (severe grooves) in 1988. Managed to get the credit union to fund it (I was a poor student at the time) and think that was the best $88/month loan I've ever had. Found the stationary fairing a bit challenging to get used to, but now it seems 'normal'.
    I rode the VFR and it was my sole ('soul'???) transportation for many years.
    On a camping trip, in 1989, my sleeping bag managed to slide off the back of the bike, but the bungy cord pulled it back, right into the rear wheel. That caused the rear wheel to lock up and I was fish-tailing down a country road from 70mph down to about 30 mph when I finally high-sided (spraining my left ankle and breaking the scaphoid bone in my right wrist. Bike was only scuffed; I had to remove the sleeping bag then ride it 100+ miles before I could get to a hospital. VERY painful. Insurance bought me a new-left-side fairing (I think that was about the only damage).
    During my school years, motorcycle parking was right on the edge of campus and allowed one to skip the bus/walk/bicycle. A time-saver.
    It was at the campus parking area (bikes were backed up to the curbs for about a block zone) where my VFR got knocked over by another motorcycle whose rider forgot to bring up the kickstand and was thoughtful enough to leave me a note with his phone number. His insurance paid for the repairs and the shop said I could get the Yoshimura 4-into-1 cheaper than NOS Honda parts (this would be about 1992). I believe that the shop epoxied the Yosh to the stock Honda 4 individual pipes where they meet under the engine. Amazing sound, way better than the stock VFR and lighter; I immediately approved. Fortunate accident, I might never have changed to the single pipe !
    Found that young ladies were always eager to go for a ride and the bike probably got me many more dates than I deserved (sorry lady VFR-riders, but did YOUR VFR's get you more dates with the men??? ha).
    Rode it 1700 miles to a friend's wedding in Iowa on a 3-day road trip. Wow, my butt was sore after that.
    It was stolen from the parking lot at a girlfriend's apartment in 1992 along with the custom VFR-themed cover that my mother had made for it (she was most upset that the cover was gone). I was devastated and angry, but bought a basket-case NT650 to fix-up and ride (I was still in school and poor).
    After graduating and getting a real job, I was in California when I got several mysterious phone calls including one from my dad who regretfully (he never approved of my motorcycles) told me that the police had 'found' my stolen VFR (the thief stole it, rode it about 4 -5 miles to another apartment complex, then parked it. Apt complex people finally called police as they considered it abandoned). I picked it up from the impound yard a week later after returning home. About the only damage was that the thief had broken the steering lock and put a scratch on the tank (damn !).
    Rode the bike as much or more than ever until one day....... it developed an OCCASIONAL mis-fire at about 5500 RPM (right where it gets fun). I swapped parts multiple times with another VFR owner, but was never able to track down the problem (my problem-solving skills were less developed). About that time I got married and the bike took a backseat. It has thus been in a 'coma' for 20 years now. I got the itch and bought a '97 VFR in the summer of 2018 and that has made me want more than ever to get the '86 back to running condition. So many projects though; my main issue is that I need to finish up my 'shop' construction so that I can work on it.
    Not to worry, it will run again !
    Brian
     
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