Front rotor ALOC bolts

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by Lint, Jan 30, 2017.

  1. Lint

    Lint Member

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    I understand the concept of the rotor bolts being one and done. That said, has anyone reused/retorqued them with thread lock? Not trying to be cheap in the wrong place, but $63 is a LOT for 24 small bolts.

    What say you?
     
  2. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Member

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    Yes, but I first ultrasonic cleaned them. Had no issues.
     
  3. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    The disc bolts are steel threaded into alloy, so IMO it is unlikely they can be torqued high enough to stretch the steel. I cleaned and re-used mine, with new Loctite.
     
  4. RVFR

    RVFR Member

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    FWIW I re used mine after a good looking and cleaning, besides did you look at the torque specs, it's not that High IMO so I reused them. Next time though this goes for all the bolts, I'm going to go here. https://www.pro-bolt.com/
     
  5. goinphaster

    goinphaster New Member

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    The Honda ones come with a "Loctite" type dry compound already put on them- so if you reuse them, take a brass brush to the threads and clean them up and reapply a thread lock on them. And whatever you do, don't over torque them thinking that is better than replacing. Correct torque and a thread lock will do the job. trust me, I are an errkraft mekan- maca-...... I fix planes.
     
  6. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy Member

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    I have reused ti rotor bolts multiple times. Wouldn't think twice about doing it. I do prefer Vibra Tite VC-3 over Loctite Blue. I don't like a threadlocker that hardens, especially when you are threading it into aluminum. It is very easy for Loctite Blue to damage threads cut into aluminum when extracting the fastener.
     
  7. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    This was hashed out in another thread somewhere here a few years ago. If my memory serves me right the consensus was that if your take proper precautions by cleaning, inspecting and proper torqueing, you would be fine.

    I pulled my rotors off a while back when I had my wheels powdered. I think that was around 2012 or something like that. I looked them over close and cleaned them up as best I could. I used Locktite blue and torqued as required in specs. I have since logged probably 25,000 miles or so on the bike and have not had an issue.

    Honda will say to replace probably for a few reasons, two of which are, they want your money for new bolts. They also will reduce any liability they wold have if there was a failure if they recommend you replace and they fail when you have not. Thing is. Each rotor had what, 8 bolts. If you are sure that all 8 are going to fail at once, your should be living in Vegas. If there is going to be a failure, I suggest one will break and you should feel that on a brake application, and hopefully you will see the broken or missing bolt, and take steps to deal with that.

    I am still running my original rotors on my bike with about 202,000 km in them. Next time I do brake pas, I will change out the rotors too just because I think it is time. I will put new bolts on at that time too. Again, it is time. But 202,000 km. That is over 125,000 miles.
     
  8. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    Do your rotors have a high hat? Its a ridge at the top of thedisk. I re-use bolts/clean them with brake cleaner, usually use something not too aggressive as i dont wana strip off a factory coating.
     
  9. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    Yes there is. I will likely replace the brake fluid lines s well at the same time, switching to braided lines. Again, it is time.
     
  10. MooseMoose

    MooseMoose New Member

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    You'll like the braided lines. The difference in feel and consistency is really great.
     
  11. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    Yes. I have heard that from several people here I have great confidence in.
     
  12. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    I install braided front brake lines on all my bikes right out of the gate. My 2 interceptors have braided clutch lines too. 93 has a rear braided line as a caliper i bought on line had it. So that bike has full braided steel stuff. :peace:
     
  13. MooseMoose

    MooseMoose New Member

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    My '91 had braided lines all around and I got spoiled by them. Firm and consistent. I could pick the back wheel up if I wanted to and it felt exactly the same, every time. That was my daily driver for 80,000 miles so I got really used to it.

    I thought the mushy lever on the '01 was because of the linked brakes, but after I redid the lines I've got a very firm lever. Half way to the bar then it stops solid. Brakes are controlled by pressure, not movement of the lever. Crapload more authority from the pedal, too, front and rear, and it is consistent.

    The bike is pretty, so you forget that it's 16 years old. You could feel the flex in some of the old lines.
     
  14. Lint

    Lint Member

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    Oooook, not sure how we are talking about brake lines....

    So, just f*cking replace them. 11 went in fine, #12 broke. Now I have to get the bolt extracted, possibly tapped and helicoiled then buy new bolts. It would have been a $4itload cheaper to have just bought new. FML
     
  15. MooseMoose

    MooseMoose New Member

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    Because Randy is talking about doing rotors AND lines at his next change, and has decided to change his bolts at that point.

    Read the thread and you'll see how it progressed. It isn't too complicated.

    As for bolt #12, sorry to hear that. Good luck with the EZ-Out.
     
  16. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    You are not supposed to use an extension bar on a ratchet when putting those buggas on there Lint. Sorry to hear about the woes. I would think that you could tap those out of there fairly easy considering the relative light torque setting used to put them in. Hopefully this has not damaged the threads on the rotor. I don't know enough about heli coils to say ya or nay on using them on your rotors but I would be cautious. I know when I stripped the oil drain threads in the pan years ago, I chose to replace the oil pan rather than using heil coils. Don't you have to change the size of the bolt when you use a heli coil? If so, you would be using 7 of one bolt and 1 of another. Something else to consider.
     
  17. Lint

    Lint Member

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    I'm just going to pay to have it removed. Just pissed I didn't just get new bolts. Well, I guess this answered the debate. FWIW, I used a standard torque wrench, 23ftlbs, after wire brushing the bolt and applying thread lock. Apparently, aluminum allows enough torque to stretch the bolts. I have to assume the previous owner reused them when he rebuilt the front end and I used them once too. So, just replace them. So much easier than this hassle.
     
  18. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    On stuff like that, I would trust my hand over the torque hammer, joking aside, I saved the broken torx bolt that I had to extract from a re-call bmw had over a decade ago. I was using an electric impact buzzing them in (really no excuse - was paid by the hour.) I busted the head off it, I had to use a spring loaded punch to bullseye it then I used a left hand drill bit to centre drill it, then I used my easy out. I got the threaded part of the bolt out of the wheel and kept the carnage on my shelf of shame. Got a nice magnetic drain plug I had to use a chisel to get off (so many stories, so little time.) anyway, that had a happy ending too.
     
  19. GreginDenver

    GreginDenver New Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  20. kennybobby

    kennybobby New Member

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    i think you over-torqued them, where did you find 23 ft-lbs for that bolt when the FSM calls out 14?
     

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