Front wheel bearing confusion

Discussion in '5th Generation 1998-2001' started by Luke678, May 18, 2019.

  1. Luke678

    Luke678 New Member

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    Hi

    I'm replacing front wheel bearings on my 5th gen.
    I installed one side first (using bearing driver). Then turned the wheel over, inserted the long spacers that sits between the two bearings inside the wheel hub and started driving the second bearing in. At some point it became impossible to move the spacer by hand when the second bearing was sitted in. Also both bearings are very stiff to move by hand.

    Am I doing something wrong ? Does the second need to go all in or do I have to make judgment as to how far it's suppose to go? I believe the spacer needs to be lose and moving about freely in the hub as this is how it was before I started the job

    Many thanks for any responses.
     
  2. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy Member

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    I typically pull the old grease seal, then use a caliper to measure how deep the bearing face is, in relation to the lip of the hub. Before I extract the old bearings. That way I know how deep the bearing needs to be without using any special tools. I know that doesn't help you much, as you are past the point of no return and can't get back there from where you already are.

    I believe the recommended factory tool has a pilot pin in the middle that will only allow you to drive the bearing in until the pilot impacts the distance collar. I can't recall if there is a machined stop inside the hub. At a minimum, you can measure the thickness of the grease seal, which usually sits just about flush with the hub face, and measure from the hub face to the current location of the bearing face to see if you've driven the bearing in too far. I always freeze the bearings first and put a light film of grease on the them, that way you can tell if you encounter any resistance, and don't blow the bearing past a machined surface inside the hub, causing damage.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2019
  3. FJ12rydertoo

    FJ12rydertoo Member

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    Hopefully the bearing driver you used fit the outer race of the bearings and the inner race.
    If the bearing driver only contacts the outer race, you could drive the bearing in too far. I
    can't remember if there's a shoulder to stop the bearing from going too far.

    I have done mine when I had the wheels powdercoated and don't remember it being a big deal.
     
  4. Luke678

    Luke678 New Member

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    Thanks guys. I didn't realise that the factory tool had a special pilot pin. That would explain why I drove the bearings too far.
    I will try again and make sure that there is only a very small gap between the bearings inner races and the spacer, will need to be careful not too tap them in too far this time.
     
  5. Luke678

    Luke678 New Member

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    Do you remember what is the distance between the hub lip and the top of the bearing when you measured it last time?
    Honda pilot tool is 20mm (that's what it says in service manual), whatever that means...

    Thanks
     
  6. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    There is also a magic sequence for bearings, the right one gets driven home fully seated, the left is driven in until it snugs up against the distance collar. The right bearing in conjunction with the spacer determines the exact distance between the right fork leg and the wheel and hence the centering of the wheel in the forks. If you drive the left bearing home first then install the right one to be snug on the collar, the wheel will sit a bit to the left and the bike will pull to the right. If you drive the left bearing shell in too far, you will apply side loading to the bearings ( a bad thing).
     
  7. Luke678

    Luke678 New Member

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    Nice one. I think I understand now. Just need to work out exactly how much space to leave between the left bearing and the inner spacer.
     
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