Adjusting 6th Gen headlight Aim

Discussion in '6th Generation 2002-2013' started by Nungboy, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. Nungboy

    Nungboy New Member

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    My question concerns adjusting the low-beam headlights on the 6th gen VFR. Mine is a 2007 and I have known all along that my headlights are too high. (I swear, every bike I have ever encountered seems too high!) Naturally, the ridiculous "Manual" has nothing to say and I never downloaded the Service Manual here. I searched the Forum on Friday and found one quick thread about finding the adjusters "behind the oil cooler" and to "use a Phillips to adjust them counterclockwise to lower" and I am pretty sure I found them. Instead of a knob or a typical Phillips screw head I found a gear that interfaces with a Phillips screwdriver (but you need to use just the right size Phillips, not too small or too large). But there are TWO of them. Both have an "A" painted near them and they do seem associated with the low beams. But, ARE THEY BOTH HEIGHT ADJUSTERS OR IS ONE HEIGHT AND THE OTHER TO ADJUST LEFT/RIGHT? I twiddled both of them counterclockwise and they seemed to bring the aim down but I still got flashed Saturday night. (They sure are awkward to adjust...I had to lie on my back and get the lighting just right.) And do they adjust the high beams as well or is there another adjuster for them?
    On a related note...do you think that some cagers are so used to single light low beam motorcycles that when they see a dual beam low bike (VFR's, ST1300's, Goldwings, etc.) they think we have high beams on and flash?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  2. SilverSurferRWB

    SilverSurferRWB Insider

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    I figure most cagers are just jerks and are jealous of you riding a bike. They probably had to listen to their wives say they wished they were on the back of the bike with you instead of in the car! I'd say leave the lights alone; if their flashing you that means they SAW you! I'd rather be seen that become a hood ornament.
     
  3. RWB25

    RWB25 New Member

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    There are 2 adjustment screws underneath the upper cowl. They are for the vertical adjustment of each light. A clockwise adjustment moves the light beam up and counter-clockwise moves it down.

    For any horizontal adjustment (left/right), the adjustment screw is on the left side of the upper cowl....on the left side of the left light. Clockwise adjustment moves the lights to the right side.

    As for the cagers.....I wouldn't give them any credit. Frankly, we're lucky if they see any light, let alone 1 or 2 beams. Let's just hope they see you.
     
  4. Nungboy

    Nungboy New Member

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    Thanks guys! That helps alot, RWB25!
    And of course, flashing the highs on makes it clear that I am on lows...
    (And I have PIAAs in all four positions so they are brighter than stock)
     
  5. hondawolf

    hondawolf New Member

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    Not sure about adjustment. Never messed with mine. Interesting, I've never been flashed by cagers in the two years I've owned the bike. According to my Honda service manual, the screw by the oil cooler are for the vertical adjustment. Clockwise moves up and counterclockwise moves them down. The horizontal adjustment is next to the high beam bulb, behind the metering panels on each side of the dash. Clockwise moves them to the right.
     
  6. Nungboy

    Nungboy New Member

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    Thanks Wolf! That backs up the previous info.
    I personally feel that many vehicles are aimed too high so when I get the flash thing I understand what wicked-bright is like. And heck, the last think I want is to have someone head-on me because they were so dazzled they couldn't keep it in their lane. Plus, LEO's will stop vehicles for being too bright, the wrong "color", etc. In my burgh they are waaaay to anxious to stop and bust your private bits. A little bright is good. Way bright...not so good
     
  7. hondawolf

    hondawolf New Member

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    No problem, glad to help. I have always been impressed with the headlights from the vfr. I had one of the bulbs go out on me last month. I rode home at night with one low beam. Could hardly tell I was missing a bulb.
     
  8. Nungboy

    Nungboy New Member

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    Agreed! That is one of the many things about the VFR's...much better lighting than most.
     
  9. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Well-Known Member

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    I posed this same question a while back and the most common answer I received was the probability that mine were aimed too high. I was often flashed from truckers in their back up lights on thier mirrors. So yeah, they were probably out of adjustment and I had them re-aligned at the shop. But occasssionally I still get flashed so I believe that you are partly correct here in that many people are used to the single MC light and therefore assume, albeit wrongly, that you have your high beams on. A very quick flash of you highs will deliver the message. But don't go tit for tat though. Two wrongs do not make a right. Although flashing the highs in most jurisdictions is in fact unlawful, the intent is to deliver a quick message and I would be surprised if you were bothered for doing so
     
  10. Nungboy

    Nungboy New Member

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    Yes, when the truckers are pissed you should pay attention and correct it!
    I think the informed person looks at dual lights and asks whether one is much brighter than the other (in which case the bike is single/single and the bright is ON) or whether they are both the same brightness (in which case they should conclude that it is a dual-light system). So, I (we) should make sure that both lows are aimed at the same height so as not to give the wrong impression. Now, I know I am giving too much credit to cagers but I know we riders look for these things. And of course then there is the Harley look with one big light and two smaller low beams on either side. But, that is another thread for another day!
     
  11. VifferDude

    VifferDude New Member

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    I'm starting to notice that a lot of people with late model VFR's have there lights aimed to high. I have the same problem with mine. And they are definately to high because when I put the high beams on the you can see the main part of the beam shining in the tree tops.
     
  12. Nungboy

    Nungboy New Member

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    Yeah, I think you are right, yours are a wee bit too high!
    So if others have this problem too, do you all just adjust by the seat of your pants so that it "looks right" or do some of you quantify the process by looking up the "recipe" for adjusting? (usually it is something like be X feet away from a flat wall, adjust so that the top of the beam is Y feet from the floor, etc.). If so, what are the figures? :confused: (In the car biz there is a piece of equipment that attaches to the little glass bumps on the headlight lens and an internal optical system shows the tech what adjuster to move to get the beam aligned.)
     
  13. ego67

    ego67 New Member

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    Hi, just baought a 2002 model and get flashed all the time. Do I have to remove all the upper cowl to get to the screws?
     
  14. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Well-Known Member

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    Further to Nungboy's post, there must be a formula the techs use when you take it in for service. Given the fact that the way the bike sits changes dramatically when someone sits on it, I would suggest that the adjustment be made with the rider sitting on the bike. Any techs out there who may want to share some expert advise so that most of us back yard know fuck alls do someting correct?
     
  15. vfr2k2

    vfr2k2 New Member

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    If it walks like a duck and sounds like a duck....it must be a duck....right.....not always....
    Consider this.....The headlight aim is directly affected by the weight appied to the suspension. Some folks are a little heavier than others.
    I believe the manual covers "Pre-Load" and "rebound damping adjusters". I think this would be the place to start. There are some good articles on the web which address setting pre-load. By ensuring proper pre-load you may reap greater benefits in that your handling and ride comfort may be improved. An added bonus is safety. A little research and understanding of this important basic setup imformation can't be over emphasized.
    However I'm sure you have all searched out and adjusted the suspensions of your charges as per the basics in the manual.
    In that case just keep adjusting those headlights.
     
  16. violetfusion

    violetfusion New Member

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    I am not sure how adjustment can be done when the tip of my Philip screwdriver was blocked by sort of gear nut. AM I suppose to use the screwdriver to push the gear nut counter clockwise to lower my beam?
     
  17. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Yes pretty much. It would be nice if Mr Honda put a big red X marks the spot, but they don't. So just find the right size Phillips driver which will neatly engage the cam. Press the driver into engagement and rotate the driver - that will allow you to slowly raise/lower the beam height.

    If you need to adjust, ensure your tyre(tire) pressures are correct, and the bike is ideally carrying it normal load.

    NB On the 6th gen, the adjusters move both the main and dipped lights together by the same amount.

    Best solution to getting the aim right requires an assistant a stretch of nice flat road in front of a wall. Measure height from floor to centre of low beam bulb (with rider sitting on the bike which should be held vertical). On steeply sloped headlights like those on the 6th Gen, it may be necessary to use a spirit level to get the height right. Then paint a clear white line at that height on the wall. Park bike facing wall roughly 4 metres (13 feet) in front of the wall. With a jacket or cloth cover one of the dipped beams. Wearing normal biking gear and with the bike carrying any usual load (top box etc) sit on your bike - try to keep it upright with virtually all your weight on the bike seat - using just your toes to maintain balance - turn on headlights and get your assistant to measure how far below the line the bright spot of the beam is located. Ideally it should be 60 mm (2.5inches) below the line on the wall. Adjust as necessary, relocate the jacket/cloth to cover the other bulb and repeat the checks/adjustment for the other dipped bulb.

    This should ensure the bike complies with typical test requirements such as the official UK test requirement here

    How To Align Your Motorcycle Headlight For MOT - The UK's Only Specialist Motorcycle Bulb retailer



    SkiMad
     
  18. Nungboy

    Nungboy New Member

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    An excellent post! Great detail!
     
  19. squirrelman

    squirrelman Well-Known Member

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    As i understand it, aim the high beams, and the lows naturally line up right.
     
  20. sunofwolf

    sunofwolf Active Member

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    P1010242.jpg I replaced my headlights-did not re aim them, but they seem to be going ok. My new blubs are putting out a lot of extra light, the low beams 60% more and the high beams 80% more
     
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