Things that took you a while to realize.

Discussion in 'New Riders' started by Gnarlymutt, Aug 1, 2016.

  1. zombie

    zombie New Member

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    Look far ahead, especially in the turns. Never take a turn leaning over the center line, saw a friend almost lose his head in front of me once. The only part of him on this side of the line were his tires. His head was probably 2 feet into the other lane and a truck came flying round the corner on the line and somehow managed to miss him. Lesson learned that day for both of us.

    When stopping for gas and I get off the bike with the side stand then put it onto the center stand, remember to put the side stand back up!!!!! People always seem to be watching when you come back off the center stand and hit the side stand. Doh!!!

    ATGATT is a pain in the ass to live by. Every time I ride, even if it's just around the block.
    However, I made a promise to my daughter and myself. So I sweat in the summer, a lot, but then I can shower.

    Most people will not understand that you can ride for 2 days with the destination being back at home. The ride is the vacation, not the destination.

    I have also learned that I don't like to ride to work in the rain, waterproof gear still eludes me. There is always a wet patch somewhere. If the forecast is for rain later then I 'm ok with getting soaked on the way home. People like to give the "I'm sorry for you" look when stuck in traffic in the torrential rain, they can't see me grinning behind the helmet though.

    The last thing I learned is that my helmet size isn't a large... It's a medium. What a difference it makes on the highway, so much less buffeting with the wind when the helmet stays locked to your head.
     
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  2. RotaryRocketeer

    RotaryRocketeer New Member

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    I have a penchant for pulling the drawstrings out of my hooded sweatshirts quite often and my ex was great at getting them back in there for me. Took me a while, but as soon as I realized how easy it was to accomplish said task with a safety pin, I was able to let her go.:eagerness:
     
  3. Big_Jim59

    Big_Jim59 Member

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    It has made me pay attention to gear. My old Bates leather jacket hangs in the closet. It still fits but i have an Olympian set that is open weave and cool in summer and warm(is) in winter. ATGATT is a huge pain in the butt but I think it's worth it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2016
  4. lanesmatb

    lanesmatb New Member

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    Everyday driving:

    Scan, scan, and scan some more. Assume you are invisible and act accordingly.

    Look ahead, not at the patch of asphalt in front of you.

    Intersections are deadly if you treat it the same as driving a cage. Finger on brake watching for movement of stopped cars.

    ________________

    Mountain/canyon riding:

    Heavy braking in and hard acceleration out of corners is your highest risk. The Dragon proves this time and time again. I have a permanent imprint on my brain when I nearly high sided on the Dragon 25 years ago trying to keep up with a WERA National Lightweights Endurance Champion (Rob Seneker). The PACE is your friend.

    Always allow a margin to correct in corners for debris and cars crossing the yellow.

    If you see one deer or turkey, there is another waiting in the weeds to put you in the hospital

    __________________________________

    Riding with friends:

    Riding with a buddy can get competitive. If you are the slower rider, you will brake heavy and accelerate hard (see above); if you are faster, your buddy will push.

    Space between bikes is a good thing.

    Patience when passing. Don't ever pass ahead of another rider waiting to pass (double jump)

    If brisk riding is planned, communicate stop points on the route to regroup. Sometimes people think they have to keep up to follow a route they don't know.

    Scott L.
     
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  5. Allyance

    Allyance Insider

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    Although not "fast" by comparison to most of you younger riders, I think that with all that I have read and learned on VFRW, I am faster and smoother than I used to be.
     
  6. Big_Jim59

    Big_Jim59 Member

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    I have almost come to terms with not being the quickest, smoothet rider on the road. I slow (a lot) for corners I can't see around. It try to ride at my own pace which out distances lesser riders and is at the same time slow for better riders. I don't care. My goal is to have fun and arrive home with the bike and I in one piece.

    Speaking of the PACE, I was drawn to an article first penned in 1991 and reprinted in Septembers issue of Motorcyclist Magazine entitled "The Pace." It is a good read for anyone who is thinking about riding sport bikes on the street especially in groups.

    http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/flashback/122_0911_the_pace_nick_ienatsch/
     
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  7. vulgar1

    vulgar1 New Member

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    For new riders: ride your own pace. Do not try and keep up with someone else on the road. If you feel like you could work on a skill more get yourself to an empty parking lot and work on it. Basically just be honest with yourself. This also applies to veteran riders. If you've been riding for 15 years but you log 1K miles a year then you aren't Rossi. Don't try and ride like him.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
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  8. FJ12rydertoo

    FJ12rydertoo New Member

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    My ex father in law used to teach his kids to ride on dirt bikes. When they could do a figure 8 lock-to-lock he said they were proficient enough to ride on their own. We always did more dirt riding than street.
     
  9. Gator

    Gator Insider

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    Things that took a while to realize..............

    I just got back from 10 wonderful days in the mountains of Colorado. What I finally realized it that I am going to take an extra 2 weeks and haul out a sport bike and a dual sport and ride. A lot.
     
  10. VFR_Mike

    VFR_Mike New Member

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    New riders or recently returned to riding riders - pick one or two things to work on and go out and work on them until you're satisfied you're doing them instinctually. Then move on to two more things until you're proficient at all the skills you've identified.

    Enjoy the ride, but pay attention. try to anticipate everything that *could* happen. You'll stay alive, and upright, a lot longer.

    Veteran riders with a new bike - all bikes are a bit different in character, feel and (sometimes) function. Learn and adapt to your new bike before you jump on and ride.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  11. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    At 175mph your helmet doesn't fit as well as at 150mph !
     
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  12. seacliff

    seacliff New Member

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    Related to that, try different brand and models of helmet. They do have different shape.
     
  13. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    Sounds like somebody may have swapped size stickers in that helmet. There are some dudes like gaytor greg who have swollen heads too. Then we got condoms from the Harley Botiques that are all labeled large.
     
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  14. VFR4Lee

    VFR4Lee New Member

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    Things that took a while to realize...........

    I do not want to do the chase after a bunch of fucking maniacs group ride.
    There is always "that guy".
    Flying solo has it's charms. :)
     
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  15. seacliff

    seacliff New Member

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    That's where you're wrong.. They're not labeled large, that's the brand name!
     
  16. AndyAK

    AndyAK Insider

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    ALWAYS have cover over your eyes. If it hasn't saved your eye or your life, you just haven't been riding enough yet.
    Being right or even being highly skilled means little when your ass is spread out over several dozen yards of asphalt.
     
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