5th gen bar risers..

Discussion in '5th Generation 1998-2001' started by weevee, Nov 1, 2018.

  1. weevee

    weevee New Member

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    Hi chaps. I've seen a number of posts on here regarding bar risers for the 5th gen VFR. I wanted to try these on my own bike, but didn't wish to pay the three-figure sum that's usually asked for them, so I had a look around for something that might do the job with a little DIY modification. I eventually made some for around £10 GBP total price.

    The attachment shows how its done. (NB. The 'bars aren't raised relative to the ground, they're raised approx. 16mm relative to the footpegs, and this gives you a slightly more upright riding position. Also, bear in mind that the bike's steering may be quickened slightly by lifting the forks 20mm through the yokes - although some riders do this anyway and prefer it).

    There is no 'load' on these brackets. They are simply acting as spacers. I have had them fitted to my 5th gen now for a couple of months with no issues - but of course, you must use them at your own discretion. If you have any doubts about using them - buy and fit the 'pukka' items instead).

    Steve

    [​IMG]
     
  2. weevee

    weevee New Member

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    Slight correction to the above: The forks aren't raised 20mm through the yokes. They're raised maybe 14mm. (..the 20mm measurement refers to the total amount of stanchion visible above the top yoke).
     
  3. Cycleman1

    Cycleman1 New Member

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    Good idea and thanks for posting. I've looked for different things one could use for a spacer that was 41 mm. I have even used plastic tube on previous bikes that had enough fork tube showing. With moving the upper tree down on the fork, ( raising the forks ), in reality I would think if you measured from the floor up to the handlebar ends you'd likely end up with the same height as without the spacers.

    You could likely get away with putting the forks in the stock position and then putting the spacers in. As long as you can get about 3/4 of the handlebar bracket to engage the fork tube you should be fine. That would give you about 1/2" rise.

    I've looked at a few of the different ideas out there, and ended up ordering the handlebar kit from Japan. I've installed that system on my BMW R1100S and it worked really well. Gives you both up and back adjustments.
     
  4. stubbs

    stubbs New Member

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    Seems like this would give you a slight change in seat/peg/bar angles, but that’s about it.

    You won’t have any less weight on the wrists since you’re raising the forks equal to the rise in the bars. Maybe a better way of looking at it is simply rotating the bike around the engine by a degree or so without changing bar height.

    Seems like a great way to maintain the bar height if you want to increase the head angle to speed up the steering though.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  5. weevee

    weevee New Member

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    In effect, fitting these has served to reduce the weight on my wrists, since I've run the bike for the last year with the yokes - and the 'bars - dropped relative to the stanchions - as many do. However, for anyone running the original set-up, it will do as you say Stubbs. (..for the sake of a tenner, it's nice to have the option!)

    Steve
     
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