Chain “clip type” link question.

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by OldSchoolInterceptor, Jan 6, 2020.

  1. OldSchoolInterceptor

    OldSchoolInterceptor New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Map
    I haven’t ridden much and I’ve never had a bike long enough to have to change out the chain. Is the clip type connecting link acceptable to use? Vs the rivet type I mean. I would guess it is since it does come with the chain but I’d like the opinion of actual riders. Thanks!
     
  2. OldSchoolInterceptor

    OldSchoolInterceptor New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Map
    I’m thinking of the Unibear O-ring 530 110 link in the gold finish.
     
  3. raYzerman

    raYzerman Insider

    Country:
    Canada
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2019
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    71
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Location:
    Millgrove, ON
    Map
    Another option is an EK chain with a screw on link... kinda cool.
     
    OldSchoolInterceptor likes this.
  4. OldSchoolInterceptor

    OldSchoolInterceptor New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Map
    Holy cr*p! Fantastic idea! You ever tried one?
     
  5. fink

    fink Member

    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,347
    Likes Received:
    377
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Ardnamurchan Penninsula, Scotland
    Map
    Chain clips are only recommended for small capacity bikes. Best to use Rivet.
     
  6. Bat-1

    Bat-1 New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2018
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Aiken, SC
    Map
    For decades clip type chains were fine for all size bikes. Then dealers/mfg. realized that owners can easily change their own chains with the clip type. Suddenly only rivet type would do, which require special tools to change.

    I've put 100k miles on 750cc plus bikes with clip type chains and never had an issue.

    Are properly installed rivets stronger? Yes. Are properly installed (this is key) clip links good enough. Yes.
     
    OldSchoolInterceptor likes this.
  7. Norse

    Norse New Member

    Country:
    Denmark
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Clips are perfectly functional. But far from ideal. They are mostly used on dirt bikes that have far fewer ponies and on which you usually remove the chain relatively often.
    While I have never personally seen one (properly fitted) break or come off on a road bike, I know that they have been tested and proven to not be as strong as rivet links.

    I have never used screw type links or even seen them in person, but I read a study that showed them to be almost identical in strength to rivet links.
    Keep in mind that the screws stick out from the master link and may interfere with chain guards, sprocket covers, etc.

    Personally, I prefer to stick with the old rivet type. They are proven to be the strongest and if fitted properly, will be 100% as strong as every other link in the chain. And they have no real down sides.
    A good chain tool set that will last your life costs little more than $100,- and some people are even reporting good experiences with way cheaper ones.

    I definitely understand that doing it yourself for the first time can be a little "scary". The chain is a pretty crucial part after all. But it really is very simple if you just follow the instructions and maybe look up a video or 2 first.
    I generally advise that people doing it for the first time buy a extra master link and use it to try the tool out on the old chain before fitting the new one. That way they get a good feel for how it works and don't have to fear messing up their brand new chain (although you can't really mess it up more than just having to redo the master link).
     
  8. bk94si

    bk94si Insider

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2018
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    60
    Trophy Points:
    58
    I currently bought a tool and use rivet links but I used clips for many years. The only minor problem I ever had was once I was doing some chain lubing and found the clip not all the way seated. It never came off but it could have eventually if I hadn't seen it.
     
    OldSchoolInterceptor likes this.
  9. OldSchoolInterceptor

    OldSchoolInterceptor New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Map
    Thanks for all your input. Does anyone know if the EK screw on link for a 530 would work on Any 530 chain? Or does it have to be an EK chain? I’d guess if it’s a 530 it would be just fine on any 530 chain as long as it’s an O-ring type. As far as the screw on link I would do what the guy in the video did and grind them down just a bit being very careful not to take too much off. Anyone tried a Unibear o-ring chain 530 110 links on oem sprocket size rated at 10,000lb tensile strength?
     
  10. FJ12rydertoo

    FJ12rydertoo Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    2,051
    Likes Received:
    222
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Platte City, MO
    Map
    Probably 99% of the bikes on the road before 1990 used clip-type masterlinks. That means that the "superbikes" of the day like the Kawasaki
    Z-1, Suzuki GS models, Honday CB750 and VF1000, all used the clip-style links. They worked very well with minimal failures. Some, of course
    but not a boatload, and most were probably due to lack of maintenance as much as anything.

    I was once informed that clip-style links wear worse due to increased tolerances allowing the clip to be installed easily. This can lead to rapid wear
    at the pins. I can personally attest to masterlinks wearing faster than the surrounding links. OTOH new O-ring style links tend to be tighter in
    fit and tolerances. But rivet links are designed to be pressed on so they are going to wear better, partly for that reason.

    The 1999 VFR800 I bought, used, in 2000 was the first bike I've ever owned that recommended a riveted masterlink. Background: I've been
    riding bikes since 1963.By the by, I've had two clip-style masterlinks fail while riding, one dirt which just went missing, and one street bike, clip came off the masterlink. No damage on the streetbike.

    Sorry to ramble on and I'll get to the bottom line: I think, especially since you said you don't ride large miles, and you have to have "special"
    equipment to change the rivet link, a clip-style master link will do you fine. I've known people to use a dab of fingernail polish on the clip to
    make it easier to check that it is still in place.

    Whatever you decide, do it and go ride. :wheelie:
     
    dhinson66 likes this.
  11. Thumbs

    Thumbs Member

    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2015
    Messages:
    861
    Likes Received:
    479
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Bath(ish)
    Map
Related Topics

Share This Page