clutch slave cylinder

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by dhinson66, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. dhinson66

    dhinson66 New Member

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    i think i've screwed up. i changed both my sprockets and chain and went to put the slave clutch cylinder on and it won't fit flush-can't get the bolts started. i believe i've read on this forum that one cannot pull the clutch lever while the slave is off or the piston will protrude. i didn't pull the clutch lever but it appears the piston came out a bit anyway. i cannot tell by looking if the piston is out but i cannot imagine any other reason for the housing to not fit flush. thoughts?
     
  2. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    Just "persuade" the slave piston to return into the cylinder, g-clamp or similar, same as you would do for a brake piston. Might even go back in with firm finger pressure. If all else fails, crack the bleed nipple first.
     
  3. dhinson66

    dhinson66 New Member

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    thanks Terry. what worries me is that it appears to be all the way in but I'm not certain what it looks like when seated. Baileyrock advised me to open the bleeder a bit then try but that did not work. I'm concerned something fundamental is wrong. Like maybe I screwed something up taking it off.
     
  4. dhinson66

    dhinson66 New Member

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    i know pictures make things easier-here are two of the unit. 20170909_153631.jpg 20170909_153625.jpg
     
  5. Darth Vader

    Darth Vader New Member

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    The worst case scenario would be you pull the clutch in and the piston pops out. You then push the piston back in and would have to bleed the system. So I don't think you've done anything bad. You need to get that piston back in all the way. G clamp, pliers , firm push just get that sucker home. Or you could start again and pump it all the way out, give it all a good clean and use red grease on the piston and seals, refit and bleed. Good luck
     
  6. dhinson66

    dhinson66 New Member

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    Well, Darth I took another member's advice and emptied the fluid (which needed changing badly-been since 1998 probably) which allowed me to just push the piston back in. Glad I did as the seal around the piston needed cleaning and lubricating-the piston was very tight before cleaning and oiling so it was a win/win. Also the reservoir was filthy with all sorts of goop that needed cleaning out. Thanks for the advice and encouragement-this site is a wonderful resource and I really appreciate the information and advice here. For some reason though the clutch pull seems harder now than before-is it my imagination? Is it possible for the pull to be harder, rather than easier with clean, new fluid or is it possible I didn't bleed the system properly?

    David
     
  7. VFR4Lee

    VFR4Lee Member

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    I'm thinking if you did not bleed enough, air in lines, the clutch lever will do nada.
    Will have no resistance when pulled.
     
  8. RllwJoe

    RllwJoe Member

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    Air in the line would compress, unlike brake fluid which does not compress.
    I think that a harder pull would be a good thing, as long as the clutch is fully engaged when you release the lever. in other words, if its not sticking.
     
  9. Darth Vader

    Darth Vader New Member

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    Yes a harder feeling in the clutch is good , means no air. Does it change gear properly now ? If yes a job well done. If no I would change the slave piston seal as it might of swelled and causing the piston to stick.
     
  10. dhinson66

    dhinson66 New Member

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    Yes it seems to change just fine-just seems a bit more difficult to pull but that could be due to my weakening grip in my old age! One thing else I noticed-the long rod that runs through the transmission case had a bit of scarring right where it meets the case. Would that roughness cause any problems? I assume that was from debris getting inside that housing over the years. Wasn't much but it was visible and one could feel the scratches.
     
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