Foward to the future?

Discussion in 'New Riders' started by Badbilly, Feb 19, 2015.

  1. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    MSF no longer administering rider training in California What does that mean for Washington State?

    By David L. Hough

    Rumors are flying about the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) stepping away from the California Motorcyclist Safety Program (CMSP). What's going on? In California, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) is the state agency responsible for motorcycle safety. For the past ten years or so, CHP have contracted with the MSF to administer rider training as well as supply curricula and training materials. During 2014, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) revised their policies on rider training. It may be that increases in the CA fatality rate caused CHP to re-evaluate how new motorcyclists are introduced to the sport. Under MSF's leadership, the fatality rate increased 63%. Nationwide, our motorcyclist fatality rate is almost triple that in Europe. In any case, the MSF declined to submit a bid to CHP, and also denied permission for anyone to use any MSF curricula in California. The bid for administration of the CMSP for 2015 was awarded to Total Control Training, managed by Lee Parks. The novice curriculum will be the "Total Control Beginner Riding Clinic", which is actually a modified version of the Idaho STAR Motorcycle Safety Program's Basic I course. The Idaho course is a modified version of the Basic Rider Training (BRT) course developed by the TEAM Oregon motorcycle safety program. When the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) reviewed motorcycle safety programs nationwide several years ago, the BRT in both Idaho and Oregon was rated highly. Retraining 600 or so California instructors and converting more than 100 training ranges to the TCBRC is a tough challenge that needs to be accomplished in a very short time frame. To help, Total Control Training will bring on board Ax Axmaker, current Program Director of the Idaho STAR program. The management switch from MSF to Total Control Training is especially noteworthy because when TEAM Oregon decided to write their own independent beginner course in the mid-1990s, they were sued by MSF for theft of "intellectual property." Apparently this wasn't just to whip Oregon back into line, but to send a message to other states to not mess with the MSF. The lawsuit was eventually settled out of court, but other states were temporarily intimidated. The situation made it clear that the "safety" arm of the motorcycle industry wanted to squelch all competition. The irony is that the very course they intended to stop is now superseding the MSF's course in California. Since California has historically been home to approximately one-third of the nation's motorcyclists, trends started on the west coast have often spread to other states. So, it's very likely that other states will begin to rethink how novice riders are trained, and start looking for alternatives to MSF curricula. Washington has already studied the BRT as a replacement for the MSF's "Basic RiderCourse". While there are no plans to move to it in the near future, as the national landscape changes, so may Washington. You might be wondering, "What's wrong with the MSF's BRC?" It's easy to teach, it's cheap, it's fun for newbie riders, it's only two days, and it typically leads to a license. What's wrong is that easy, cheap, fun and fast "training" is putting too many riders on the road without the necessary skills and knowledge to survive traffic. Too many of them are becoming fatalities. Maybe that's what CHP figured out?
     
  2. GreyVF750F

    GreyVF750F Member

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    Very interesting.........
     
  3. Pliskin

    Pliskin New Member

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    Who can argue with a guy name Ax Axemaker.

    So does this mean we should no longer tell newbies to this forum to go take a course? They're better off just winging it?
     
  4. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    The dude has a scary name, that's for sure..

    IMO we should recommend they ride VFRs instead of winging it. Other unnamed marques are too horrible to even consider. ;)


    All this will take a shitload of sorting out. Both Dave Hough and Lee Parks are well respected in the industry. If the quoted stats are accurate then IMO the program needs revision.

    Hopefully the CHP will not use Panch and John as poster boys..
     
  5. RobVG

    RobVG Member

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    Way back when in Washington, you went to the DVM, got a book, took a test and got a learners permit. Before 6 mo.s were up, and if you were still alive, you took the riding test and got your endorsement.

    There were no "safety" courses. The only good info in the book was the obligatory "ride like your invisible" and don't travel on the right side of your lane because it encourages lane sharing by other cars. Funny the things you remember.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2015
  6. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    Any training from a propely trained instructor is better than none. In BC, several of the Driver Training Companies offer mc training as well. None that I am aware of have or ever had any affilliation with the USA's MSF. I think that is strictly an American outfit.
     
  7. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1rKQReqJZg
     
  8. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    Way back in WA there was no requirement at all. Now all states and the District of Columbia require certification. WA went through several iterations including the one that was nothing but a revenue generator based on displacement.


    Overview

    All 50 States and the District of Columbia require motorcyclists to obtain a motorcycle operator license or endorsement before they ride on public highways. The goal of licensing is to ensure that motorcyclists have the minimum knowledge and skills needed to operate a motorcycle safely.

    However, many motorcyclists are not properly licensed. In 2005, 24 percent of motorcycle operators involved in fatal crashes did not have a valid motorcycle license, compared to 12 percent of drivers of passenger vehicles who were not properly licensed. Many of these motorcyclists did have a driver’s license but not a motorcycle endorsement.

    State motorcycle licensing practices vary substantially. Most States have a learner’s permit requiring only vision and knowledge tests. Motorcyclists with a learner’s permit can ride only in restricted circumstances, typically some combination of no passengers, only during daylight hours, and only with the supervision of a fully licensed motorcyclist. A skills test is required for full licensure. Two-thirds of the States use one of three tests developed by the MSF and AAMVA while one-third use their own tests. See Baer, Cook, and Baldi (2005) for a summary of each State’s licensing requirements and procedures and MSF
    (www.msf-usa.org) for a list of State licensing and registration requirements as of 2002. NCHRP (under review, Strategy D1) summarizes the major skills tests currently in use by licensing agencies.

    Objective: Ensure that all motorcycle operators riding on public roads are properly licensed.

    Strategy 4.1: Administration – Identify and remove barriers to obtaining a motorcycle license.

    Barriers to obtaining a motorcycle license include limited and inconvenient licensing examination hours, which sometimes require appointments weeks or months in advance, and licensing systems in some States that provide no incentive to become fully licensed because learner’s permits may be renewed indefinitely.

    Action steps:
    •State motorcycle safety administrators and motor vehicle administrators examine the relationship between training and licensing and integrate motorcycle operator training and licensing into one-stop operations (see Strategy 5.3).


    •State motor vehicle administrators offer licensing examinations during evening and weekend hours.

    Promising practices:
    •Minnesota offers licensing exams during evening hours (www.dps.state.mn.us/mmsc/latest/MMSCHome.asp?cid=1).


    •Forty-five States waive the skills test and 21 waive the knowledge test for motorcycle operators who have successfully completed an approved training course.

    Resources and supporting activities:
    •AAMVA’s Motorcycle Operator Licensing System and Integrating Motorcycle Rider Education and Licensing manuals provide guidelines for State motorcycle licensing programs (www.aamva.org). AAMVA is updating these manuals in 2006 under a cooperative agreement with NHTSA.

    Strategy 4.2: Promotion – Encourage motorcycle operators to be properly licensed.

    Motorcycle license promotion should inform motorcycle operators of the advantages of and incentives for proper licensure as well as providing information on licensing requirements and procedures. Promotion also should inform operators of the potential consequences of riding while not properly licensed.

    Action steps:
    •Promote the advantages of proper licensing through dealers, rider groups, rider media, State highway patrol and local law enforcement motorcycle officers and other appropriate methods.


    •State highway safety offices, State motorcycle safety administrators, and law enforcement inform motorcycle operators of the potential consequences of operating a motorcycle without a proper license.

    Promising practices:
    •Many States have motorcycle operator licensing information and motorcycle operator handbooks available on their Web sites.


    •Maryland’s DMV compared their motorcycle registration and motorcycle operator licensing files. They then sent a letter to each owner of a registered motorcycle who did not have a motorcycle operator’s license. This quick and inexpensive strategy caused 1,700 owners to become licensed within four months. For information, contact the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration at 410-424-3731 or akrajewski@mdot.state.md.us. In 2006, Ohio will send letters to over 10,000 to non-licensed motorcycle owners to encourage licensing. For information, contact the Ohio Motorcycle Coordinator at 614-466-4042 or bsecrest@dps.state.oh.us.

    Resources and supporting activities:
    •MSF provides a variety of information publicizing proper licensing (www.msf-usa.org).

    Strategy 4.3: Quality – Train license examiners in motorcycle license testing techniques.

    Licensing tests serve as a valid measure of motorcycle operator skills and knowledge only if license examiners are properly trained and qualified. Just as automotive license examiners need specialized training and skills beyond those needed to drive a car, motorcycle license examiners need specialized training, knowledge, and skills.

    Action steps:
    •Certify all motorcycle license examiners through the AAMVA Certified Motorcycle Examiner program.


    •Increase the number of examiners qualified to test motorcyclists if needed.

    Promising practices:
    •The AAMVA Certified Motorcycle Examiner program was developed in cooperation with the MSF to recognize and certify examiners. To become certified, examiners must complete a minimum of one year as a full-time on-the-job driver examiner actively conducting motorcycle skills or road tests and must pass an examination. For information, see www.aamva.org/EducationTraining/Programs/CertifiedMotorcycleExaminerCME.htm.


    •Some State motorcycle safety programs, for example in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, collaborate with their motor vehicle departments to train license examiners.

    Resources and supporting activities:
    The 2005 Certified Motorcycle Examiner program overview is available from AAMVA at www.aamva.org/EducationTraining/Programs/CertifiedMotorcycleExaminerCME.htm.

    Strategy 4.4: Enforcement – Actively enforce penalties for operating a motorcycle without a proper license or endorsement.

    Law enforcement should routinely check for a proper motorcycle operator’s license or endorsement when stopping a motorcyclist for any potential traffic violation, as they do for other vehicle operators. To do this, officers must be able to recognize a valid operator’s license or endorsement.

    Action steps:
    •Law enforcement patrol officers adopt a zero tolerance approach to enforcing improper motorcycle operator licensure by checking for a proper motorcycle endorsement and issuing citations for an improper license or endorsement.


    •State highway safety office law enforcement liaisons meet with law enforcement agencies to encourage zero tolerance of improperly licensed motorcyclists.

    Promising practices:
    •Law enforcement can raise the importance of motorcycle license enforcement at roll calls, through law enforcement listservs, or through other law enforcement channels.


    •Oregon presents information on this issue at State judicial conferences.

    Resources and supporting activities:
    •No specific resources for this strategy.


    References and notes for Section 4, Licensing

    NAMS recommendations for States and communities on motorcycle operator licensing.
    11. Merge rider education and training and licensing functions to form one-stop operations.
    16. Identify and remove barriers to obtaining a motorcycle endorsement.
    17. Develop and implement programs to allow all state motorcycle safety programs to issue motorcycle endorsements immediately upon successful completion of rider training courses.
    18. Enforce penalties for operating a motorcycle without a proper endorsement.
    19. Encourage states and jurisdiction to provide motorcycle specific training to license examiners administering testing for motorcyclists.

    General references on motorcycle operator licensing.
    •Baer, J.D., Cook, A.L., and Baldi, S. (2005). Motorcycle Rider Education and Licensing: A Review of Programs and Practices. DOT HS 809 852. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/motorcycle/McycleRiderWeb/pages/index.htm. A summary of motorcycle operator education and licensing practices across the States and a listing of each State’s practices as of 2001, from 38 States.
    •Baer, J.D., Baldi, S., and Cook, A.L. (2005). Promising Practices in Motorcycle Rider Education and Licensing. DOT HS 809 922. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/motorcycle/MotorcycleRider/. Promising practices from five States (Delaware, Idaho, Maryland, Nevada, and Oregon).


    •The MSF Web site (www.msf-usa.org) lists State licensing and registration requirements as of 2002.


    •NCHRP (under review). Guide for Addressing Collisions Involving Motorcycles, Strategy D3, Identify and remove barriers to obtaining a motorcycle endorsement. When released, the guide will be available at www.ch2m.com/nchrp/over/default.htm.


    •AAMVA’s Motorcycle Operator Licensing System and Integrating Motorcycle Rider Education and Licensing manuals provide guidelines for State motorcycle licensing programs (www.aamva.org). AAMVA is updating these manuals in 2006 under a cooperative agreement with NHTSA.
     
  9. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    As in the states, motorcycle endorsements vary in Canada from Province to Province.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driver's_licence_in_Canada

    It might follow that the private outfits that provide training to secure a motorcycle endorsement might gear that training to the Province.

    The drift here in the states is IMO to standardize at least the training part so aside from the fools who do all that stupid shit and take themselves oot we can ride better and longer.
     
  10. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    Axe will be a featured guest along with Clement Salvatori and Mike Sullivan at the Soundrider Sportbike NorthWest Rally in Oregon in August. Rally dude Tom Mehren got a cover shot on Rider mag recently. This year's rally will be limited to 400 bikes.. Details at www.soundrider.com.
     
  11. Bryan88

    Bryan88 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Interesting reading BB. Am I correct in assuming that in some states you can get a licence from doing a course with a private company? In SA all motor vehicle licences are handled by our DMV and the tests are standardized. A large percentage of motorcyclists here only have car licenses too, or a learners licence which is valid for 2 yrs and only prohibits carrying of passengers and riding on freeways.
     
  12. Gator

    Gator Insider

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    I did not know that MSF actually sued Team Oregon. Not so much for "intellectual property" but to intimidate other states.

    Here is Fl they go take their riding test with proper gear on then promptly don their gear for shorts, T shirt, flip flops and attach their helmet to the rear. Brilliant.
     
  13. freewheelburner

    freewheelburner New Member

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    I know in the East it's different. You can take a book test and get a permit. You can run on a permit for 1 or 2 years as long as you are within a 1/4 mile of a licensed rider. Gets you a lot of seat time before your test. When I bought my first bike in 89', the dealer rode it over to the DMV for me and I took my test. Had never even ridden a street bike before. Lol! How things change.
     
  14. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    Here we have "states rights". Each state has the "right" to make laws pertaining to itself. The "Fed" is similar. If this sounds like a shitload of confusion you are spot on..


    MSF and Team Oregon are both subsidized. They fall into the sort of, kind of private biz areas..

    So bottom line is that one can get a license or endorsement by employing several methods including a visit and a test given by one's own state DMV and even that should be checked out before showing up an pounding on the counter at one's own DMV.

    I hope this helps.. LOL
     
  15. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    East to me is Idaho and beyond.. What if the licensed rider is not riding a bike? Sounds like some lawyer wrote the rules on that one.

    I took the WA test in the early 80's, The DMV person did not speak English well and she had never administered the riding test. This on my SR500. At aboot that same time WA had a tiered system based on engine displacement. One of my buds who was the BMW dealer in Seattle told me he failed the riding test on his own BMW. I got another friend to give me a bogus invoice for a 90mm piston for my SR500 bumping the displacement up to the next tier. Passed with flying colors.

    Lets hear it for the bureaucrats and politicians and let them ride Harleys..;)
     
  16. Badbilly

    Badbilly Official VFRWorld Troll Of The Year!

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    Much like the Harley suit on crankpin/sound thing Harley filed against the Japanese.

    You should be careful aboot the no ATGATT thing there or the harleydoods up here will be in your hood before long.. There goes the neighborhood... ;)
     
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