Frame Sliders

Discussion in '5th Generation 1998-2001' started by Skifreak, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. Skifreak

    Skifreak New Member

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    Yes, tcooper27, definitely wating for installation pics.
     
  2. tcooper27

    tcooper27 New Member

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    zx14sliders.jpg

    Sliders came in Friday, they're pretty dang long. I ran out of time to mod my water bottle over the weekend so I'll be trying to find time to do it this week. Anyone have some tips on the easiest way to mod that sucker?
     
  3. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Hmm - you are starting to see one of the reasons why the R&G kit is not cheap as it comes complete with a purpose made replacement coolant bottle which neatly allows the frame slider bolt to pass right through the frame, and has the same coolant capacity as the stock unit.

    So the bike is not off the road too long - it may be worth getting hold of a spare coolant bottle to modify, rather than let loose with the one on your bike. Obviously it will be pretty easy to cut chunks out of the coolant bottle plastic with a Stanley knife, but the fun bit will be successfully welding/sealing off the cut off bit so you end up with a reliable watertight container which can handle normal stresses and temperature changes.

    As for those poly sliders - you may be able to cut them down with a dremel or even an angle grinder - just watch your eyes! But its a while since I fitted the R&G ones on my VFR, but I am certain that they were intentionally two different lengths - to provide sufficient clearance around the vulnerable bits of the bike which stick out slightly more on one side of the bike than the other. Also the rubber bit is a lot shorter (roughly half) and is stepped out, so you don't need to cut anywhere near such a large hole in the fairing. The system came complete with asymmetric metal sleeves for each side and a special ductile bolt to pass through the frame, rather than use a cheap off the shelf high strength steel bolt. That way if the bike does go sliding down the road the bolt will bend and absorb a lot of the initial impact rather than snap or overload and deform the frame.

    It will be interesting to see how cost effective this pans out - keep the pictures coming - we like pictures.:cool:



    SkiMad
     
  4. VFRIRL

    VFRIRL New Member

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    I was just about to buy Lust Racing protectors when I decided to look on here for anyone with experience of them, saved myself some cash!! thanks
     
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  5. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Good to see this old forum thread is still of value. We are now up to 39 pages of reasons why investing in decent frame sliders makes sense.
    https://vfrworld.com/threads/you-dropped-it-how-many-time.44298/page-39#post-606214

    Unfortunately as has often been said, some of these no cut designs may look pretty, but are not really up to the job with heavier bikes and may well exacerbate the damage unlike heavy duty sliders bolting to the frame which are designed to contain typical track day racerl damage where you and your bike part company and it decides to go sliding down the road - hence they are very effective minimising damage from a simple tip over.

    Personally I have tested the R&G sliders with tip overs and when the bike took a nap on a roundabout. In each case the bike and fairings came through unscathed.

    But an important part of that outcome is a couple of very well known tips:

    Wing mirrors and levers can snap off if bolted on firmly. What you want to do is adjust the mounting bolts so they are only just tight enough for the lever/mirror to stay precisely where you want them, but still loose enough so they have the potential to rotate harmlessly out of the way if the bike takes a nap rather than snap off.
     
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