Help! - Trottle Hand Getting Sore/Numb

Discussion in 'New Riders' started by CowtownNub, Jun 28, 2009.

  1. CowtownNub

    CowtownNub New Member

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    Hey Guys, I hope that some of you might have some insight for me. I'm a new rider who just got his go-fast-pass about a month ago. I'd never ridden bikes when I was younger so I'm green as can be. I did opt to take a riding course from our local Safety Council before getting my lic. and that helped immensely with making me comfortable with the ride. However, since I've gotten out on my own for a few hundred km's (miles/2 for our yanks), about an even split between highway and in-city, I've noticed that the large pad of my thumb on my right hand tends to get sore about 15/20 minutes into a ride and on longer rides (45+ mins), a large part of my right hand can get numb. A friend who rides suggested that the symptoms might simply be due to a newer rider with a death-grip on the throttle. In the past week or so, I've made a real considered effort of easing up my grip on the control but it hasn't made a real significant difference. The bike is almost a perfect fit for me as I'm 5'10" with a normal arm length and the bars are stock with no risers. I find it most comfortable to ride fairly close to the tank so that most of my weight is over the foot pegs so that I'm not leaning forward too much and relying on the bars to hold me up. Lastly, I've found no difference between 3 different pairs of gloves (light motocross, heavy weather leather, and mechanics gloves). Now comes the "Your Opinion" part:

    1. Do you think that my buddy is right and I'm just inexperienced and gripping too hard...

    2. Is it possible that the angle of the bars could/should be adjusted slightly inward toward the tank...

    3. Would bar risers help to transfer my weight back even farther...

    4. Should I attempt to find a local witch doctor to have the demon excised from my right handlebar/hand/both...

    Any help would be appreciated as I'm planning on taking my first big 3-4 hour ride in a month or so and am not looking forward to suffering through the whole thing.
     
  2. mrich12000

    mrich12000 New Member

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    sell the bike:eek:
     
  3. CowtownNub

    CowtownNub New Member

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    Thanks man, knew I could count on help....
     
  4. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    I would suspect you have the death grip still. Or it could be that you just need a bit of time to accustom your hands to the grip. My 06 was my first experience at riding and it is bone stock. And my riding position seems to be similar to yours as well as my size. My belly may be bigger though. Personally I never ran into that problem, even during my trip to Atascadero California this past spring. Another consideration is that you may need better bar ends that dampen any vibration that the bike may send your way. Keep riding. See what happens before you put out a bunch of money.
     
  5. mrich12000

    mrich12000 New Member

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    :tongue:So I guess that recieve your attention. Now what is needed as I was having that problem for ever I went and bought a fuel miser it is a ittle device that is put on the throtle lookit up (Google) most bike shops carry it. A Sargent seat is the next fix for your Bum. Make sure your handle bar grip angle is correct. If it is the hands(sic) going to sleep, go to your doctor and have the bloodflow to your hand Doplered as this could be an early heart problem (note this is a danger to your Health)I did and found I was Diabetic!!
    Cheers ps. don`t sell the bike lol..:thumbsup:
     
  6. jasonsmith

    jasonsmith Member

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    It makes a huge difference when you just relax and loosen up. Remember, the bike will stay upright on it's own (when moving), you can ride and steer with no hands if you wanted to. What that means is that your just along for the ride for the most part so no sense on hangin on to her like she's gonna buck you off. You feel better all over.
     
  7. mrich12000

    mrich12000 New Member

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    I agree with that as well
     
  8. FrankoQ

    FrankoQ New Member

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    Relax the hands when riding.
    Perhaps change the grips?
     
  9. Spectre

    Spectre New Member

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    I too would first suspect the 'death grip' habit. Unlike motorcycles with carbureted engines, fuel injected engines often tend to have throttles which are rather twitchy and unforgiving until you get used to this by first learning to just keep your right wrist relaxed. Also, if your seat if canted too far forward, in which you find your pelvis sliding forward and downward onto the tank, this may cause your arms and wrists to become fatigued and sore rather quickly.

    I would keep riding, learn to relax more, and if the problem persists I would suggest a Sargent seat in which you tell them to add extra padding to the horn of the saddle (I did so with excellent results) before you change anything else. Also, try taking 250-375 mg. of Naprosyn (an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory) before you ride, as well as perhaps a daily dose of glucosamine, which is available through General Nutrition Center.

    Let us know how you fare.
     
  10. mrich12000

    mrich12000 New Member

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    Boy that is geat advice..:thumbsup:
     
  11. great white

    great white New Member

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    I've got nerve damage in my throttle hand wrist and feel your pain.

    I use a throttle lock so I can lest got of the grip now and then and shake the numbness out of my hand (completely dead after 15 mins).

    If your grip is too tight, your hand will go numb. If your riding gloves are a bit too tight, same thing can happen.

    Spend a lot of time on the computer? Carpal tunnel also produced this effect and is agrevated by riding.

    Make sure you take advantage of any adjustability in your bikes bars to see if you can find a better position for you wrists.

    That's about it off the top of my head...
     
  12. CowtownNub

    CowtownNub New Member

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    That's awesome boys, thanks. Y'know, I figure that it may be a combination. I'm sure that I'm still death-gripping it a bit but I also hadn't considered the blood-flow or nerve damage. It may be a wise idea to get it checked and as for my wrist, I'd actually broken both bones in that wrist clear apart when I was a kid and it's acted up probably once a year or two since then if I've really strained it on something. Either way, it gives me some things to look at and work on. Thanks all for the input, I appreciate it!
     
  13. supertex

    supertex New Member

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    First off my answer is coming from a different direction being a golf pro and seeing strange things happen to peoples hands with incorrect positioning and pressure. You stated that you were losing sensation on your thumb pad? It sounds as if you are using your fingers a little too much coupled with your new rider death grip. The combination could cause this exact thing along with other hand problems falling in line at different time intervals. Do everything folks said before me but also make sure you are not placing the pad of your thumb on the grip directly. Instead place it lightly on top of the tip of your pointer finger. Hope you get it worked out. :smile:
     
  14. great white

    great white New Member

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    Funny, that's how I got a bit of nerve damage in my wrist:

    Broken bones....

    Doesn't bother me except when I'm riding or holding my hand in one position too long (holding the steering wheel on long highway drives does it too). 15-20 mins seems to be the time for me, then I have to "shake it out" for 15-30 secs.

    I've got a throttle lock to let me relax my wrist from time to time, there also used to be a thottle "helper" that allowed you to relax your grip completely and hold the throttle on with just the weight of your arm/hand

    Vita cruise throttle lock:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    NEP throttle lock (most affordable and what I use):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Throttlerocker:

    [​IMG]

    http://www.throttlerocker.com/

    It's quick and easy to install, but I've never been a fan because it just seems to easy too accidentally roll on the throttle if you hit a bump or something...very bad...


    Or if you want a cleaner look and have a couple bucks burning a hole in your pocket...

    Throttle meister:

    [​IMG]

    http://www.throttlemeister.com/

    In addition to being a throttle lock, they also act as bar end weights. This may help to quell a bit more vibration (well, change the freq actually) which often a cause of poor blood flow and numbness.

    I do agree with the posts and the "beginner death grip" though. You only need a light touch for throttle control....
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2009
  15. Boris92

    Boris92 New Member

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    I ran into the same problem when I first got my '07. Being my first street bike I thought it was just the seating position putting too much weight on the hands. First thing I did was buy a good pair of sport bike gloves (c/w padded palms) and that took care of 80% of the problem. Since then I've added cruise control and helibars which have cured the problem completely.

    Cheers
     
  16. xeipher

    xeipher New Member

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    Since this is your first bike and looks like you got a license a month back. You might want to reconsider the throttle lock approach. Do not think its wise for new riders to use throttle locks, can hinder during emergencies. Throttle locks really help on long rides where you primarily riding on highways and the coast is pretty much clear.

    The good thing about VFRs is that they have center stand. Ask your buddies with more rider experience to check out your riding stance. Put the bike on the center stand, and take a seat. Position your body as you would be riding, and ask your buddy to help you to correct your stance.

    Your arms should be bent and the weight should be held up by your back, stomach(resting on the tank) and gripping the tank with your legs a combination of all the three.

    Be safe.
     
  17. Echo3Niner

    Echo3Niner New Member

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    I too have that same issue, after about 45-60 minutes in the saddle. I have found that it is obviously a blood flow problem, so whenever I'm at a stop I drop my arm to my side and wiggle my fingers, and can feel the blood begin to circulate again. I have found it is mainly because as I get tired, I lock my elbows and use my locked arms to rest all my weight on. This same issue happens to military folks when at attention too long in formation, they lock their knees and the blood settles to their feet, and doesn't come back; even to Marines in really good shape. I'd recommend watching your arm position and ensuring you have your elbows bents and use your legs on the pegs to support you from time to time and take all the weight off your arms. That and dropping my arm to my side when I can helps me.
     
  18. Boris92

    Boris92 New Member

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    I agree that changing up your position is important. The nice thing about the cruise control is that it lets me take either hand off the bars and straighten my back during long straight stretches of road.
     
  19. great white

    great white New Member

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    Nah, the throttle locks I mentioned are easily overcome by simply rolling the throttle back. "Lock" is a bit of a misnomer, they just give the thottle enough friction to keep it from rolling back under return spring pressure. The problem comes in when people try to use them like "cruise control", which they are not.

    I only use mine to hold the throttle long enough to flex my throttle hand, get the feeling back and then it's flicked off. Which is what I recommned the OP use a throttle lock for. Hand gets numb, flip the lock on, shake it out, grip, then pop the lock back off.

    Good point of positioning, although I find most modern bikes put too much weight on the wrists these days.

    Meh, I'm just too old I guess....:rolleyes:
     
  20. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    Handle your throttle like it is a woman's breast...not a cow's teete.
     
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