How to check Cam Timing?

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by signal, Mar 25, 2020.

  1. signal

    signal New Member

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    Is there an easy way to check if the timing is correct? Its possible when CCT gets installed or when Valve Inspection is done, that the timing gets messed with......I have heard of the chain skipping a few teeth and things still work, but there can be consequences of course. I want to verify all is set right with my bike and I am hoping there is a way without taking the cylinder heads off.

    Like for example, is there a where you could pull a coil, use a dowel to "push" a cylinder all the way UP, and then use the sight window on the Cam to just read timing marks and verify?
     
  2. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy Member

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    [​IMG]

    It isn't exactly easy, but it's not too difficult to thread a dial gauge into a spark plug hole to check TDC and BDC. Jumping two teeth on the cam gears and having it still run correctly is something I've never seen in person. It is possible to slot the bolt holes on the cam gears and change the cam timing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
  3. squirrelman#1

    squirrelman#1 New Member

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    checking cam timing is a matter of comparing crankshaft marks (under the clutch cover inspection hole) with marks on cams and cam holder marks at or near tdc. study the manual, and it should answer your questions.
     
  4. signal

    signal New Member

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    I will be reading the manual more on this. What I have read so far, leads me to believe that reading the crank marks isn't too bad, as you have easy access on the right side of the bike. Reading the actual marks on the cams it would seem you would have to pull the head to do that. It may not be in the manual to go about it another way, for example, is it possible to just push the cylinders up with a dowel and then extrapolate the position of the cam that way.......or is that just not possible? The manual is going to say to pull the airbox, throttle body, head, etc.......but is that necessary?
     
  5. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    Checking the timing requires you to verify the position of the crank and the cams. To do that, you absolutely need to have the cam covers removed so that you can view the marks scribed on the cam sprockets. Basically you line up a specific timing mark on the crank, and at that point the lines scribed on the sprockets should align with the flat surface of the gasket face. Definitely a case of needing the manual to do a proper job, head over to VFR Discussion and download it: https://www.vfrdiscussion.com/index...h-gen-2002-vtec-with-bookmarks-new-cover-ocr/
     
  6. signal

    signal New Member

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    I have the manual, i have been working on the bike for years. But I had a shop do my valve inspection, and I am 3rd owner of this bike, so its possible things have been fouled up in there and i wanted to verify. I will read the manual. I just had valve inspection like 2000 miles ago, so I won't have to go through all that, but I guess I would like to pop the covers and verify timing. I'll just have to buy some gaskets I guess, and maybe some sealing washers for the fuel tank and a few things to do the job.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
  7. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    You don't need to buy any of those things...the cam cover gaskets are reuseable, and if the 6th gen is the same as the 5th, the tank can be flipped over and laid on padding on the rear seat rails. You do need some gasket sealer but that should be all. If it were me, I'd start on the rear bank as that one is easier to get to; if that looks OK, you could then decide if you really need to pull the front cover off.
     
  8. signal

    signal New Member

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    Youre right you can flip the tank over, I guess on some jobs I have just bought those sealing washers and pulled the tank. I'll always second guess unless I check the front, so I gotta do it. Good to know I can just use gasket sealant.......I have never used that stuff I'll have to watch some videos on it.
     
  9. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    You only need the sealer on the half-moon sections of the gasket; the rest of the flat gasket is installed clean and dry. I use a little dab of sealer into the corners of the half moons, then smear it over the rest of the curve with my finger. You don't need much, when you pull the gaskets off you'll see what is left there after the gasket was installed/compressed the last time.
     
  10. bk94si

    bk94si Insider

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    I hope it is just that you are using the wrong terms but you don't need to pull the heads, only the valve covers.
     
  11. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy Member

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    That's part of what created some confusion as to exactly what was the goal to be accomplished. I prolly should have asked a couple more questions, instead of contributing to the confusion. Oh well, it's not the first time I have put the ass in assume.
     
  12. signal

    signal New Member

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    Yes, thats just me using wrong terms.
     
  13. signal

    signal New Member

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    Well, I appreciate you all correcting me. I have spent a lot of time around the looms, sensors, throttle body and done a fair amount of maint, but I have never delved into the engine or the clutch. It will give me peace of mind to be able to get into it, check the timing and put it back. Along the way, I can test the Cam Position Sensor and even replace it if need be, and clean up and check torque on many bits along the way as I put it back together.
     
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