Introduction and, apologies, a couple of questions...

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by steviecat, May 1, 2022.

  1. steviecat

    steviecat New Member

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    Hi.
    Thanks for letting me join. I'm a Brit living in France. I'm retired and, after a 40 year layoff, have made the mad decision to get back on a bike - purely fine weather biking, I hasten to add. Anyway, with my usual balls out approach to anything, I have bought myself a 1993 VF750C. Yep, I know. Damn thing is twice as heavy as the last bike I owned all those years ago. Still, nothing ventured... So, I'm getting a few refresher lessons - have already dumped the school's Yamaha 700, which didn't do my confidence any good at all. But they've got me doing slow turns and figure of eights with no throttle. I'm sure it will be useful, but I can't get to grips with it and reckon I never will. I've taken the VF up the lane and back a couple of times and the weight of it has me in a bit of a flat spin. It's no Harley or Gold Wing, but a feather-weight it is not. I'll post some pictures when I figure out how to transfer them from my phone - sure is a purdy beast! As I said at the top, I have a couple of questions - if you'll forgive me for asking when I've been here for less than five minutes. Will be an active participant, promise.
    Rear brake is squealing when applied. Could it be dust/debris - or should I assume new shoes are required?
    Bike only has a side stand; is there any way of working on the back end in this situation - paddock stand, perhaps?
    Looking on the interweb, there appears to be two types of brake shoe: one has a full hole in each shoe, which I guess locates on a peg in the hub, and one has two semi-circular cut-outs, which I imagine enclose the peg.
    Any help, much appreciated.
    Once again, many thanks for letting me join. If you are okay with it, I'll keep you posted as to my progress in this new world I'm building. Best. Steve.
     
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  2. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    Welcome Steviecat. I'm not sure whether anyone else here has the VF750C, if I recall correctly that is based on the earlier VFR750 motor but in a custom, two shock chassis.

    I've not had a a bike with a drum brake since....1982. But I would expect there to be an external indicator, maybe a cast arrow or similar on the hub, indicating when replacement was needed. If it was me, I'd have the wheel out for an inspection if you don't know the bike's history, and give it a clean up and deglaze the pads/drum if necessary. You may be able to lift the back end using a block under the sidestand (so the bike is closer to vertical) and a car jack under a solid point on the right side. But a paddock stand is definitely the nicest and most secure way to be working on a bike with no centrestand.

    Slow riding is something that takes time to master. I have been taught to control speed with gentle use of the back brake, and slip the clutch with a bit of throttle, in order to maintain control. Whatever you do when turning slow and tight, don't touch the front brake. And most importantly keep your head up and turned to look where you want to be going, don't look down in front.
     
  3. steviecat

    steviecat New Member

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    Hi, Terry.
    Many thanks for your very helpful reply. I will check for the indicator and follow your advice; I have much to learn/relearn. Also, will order a paddock stand for a more secure operation. Yes, your experience of slow riding is how the riding school is teaching it, but I admit to feeling insecure at those speeds. I really need to get the bike out to a parking lot and practise on my own, I guess. I also think your assessment of the bike's gestation is correct. Once again, many thanks for replying and, I'm with your 'I ride faster than slow riders, and slower than fast ones,' one-hundred percent :) Best.
     
  4. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Hi Stevie and Welcome to the MadHouse:Welcome:

    It sounds like you have snagged a fairly rare member of the V4 family, which will hopefully provide many years of happy riding.

    You will soon discover that the folks on here really like photos - so before people start raggin on you it is a good idea to post up a photo or two of your VFR. it is easy - just click on the "upload a file" link bottom right and then follow prompts to select and upload an image from your computer. You may also want to update your forum profile to include an approximate location city/Department is ample. That way if you need help with an issue you may find someone living nearby willing to swing by and offer advice or even pick up a wrench if you have a well stocked beer fridge :drink:.

    As for the weight of your VFR it is certainly worth taking care until you get used to the bike. However you will soon discover that it really only poses an issue when the bike is travelling at very slow speed or stationery. As this thread makes clear you will not be the first rider to drop their motorbike..

    The upside is of course that the extra weight means that once at speed it is very stable and is far less affected by cross winds or when storming past large trucks. Obviously weight is less an issue for taller and stronger riders. Whilst it is nice to be able to flat foot when stopping if you have a short inside leg measurement then you may need to shuffle to the side of the seat to ensure your foot is firmly planted when stopping in traffic. The key trick is to keep the bike almost upright because they can quickly pass the point of no return and end on there side.

    So if your fairings are still in good order I would consider fitting frame sliders which have the added benefit of minimising the risk of you being trapped with your leg wedged beneath a quarter tonne of motorbike during a tip over.

    If you are still struggling you may want to see whether the local motorcycle gendarme brigade offer "Trajectories" training sessions. These are heavily subsidised sessions are a great way to get confidence and after a moring close control session through cones etc you will finish with a road riding session in the afternoon following a gendarme which can help you identify the safest line and speed through bends.

    Have fun ATGATT


    SkiMad
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2022
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  5. Terry Smith

    Terry Smith Member

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    I found an owner's manual that looks about right and that included how to assess the rear brake pad wear. Hope that is helpful. brake.png
     

    Attached Files:

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  6. steviecat

    steviecat New Member

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    Hi, Ski. Huge thanks for the welcome and the sound advice, all of which resonates with me. I will upload the only picture I have, so far. More will no doubt follow. I will also look into the training you mention - is that the French gendarmerie you were referring to? If so, that could be very useful; my next-door neighbour is a gendarme - and he has just started training for the motorcycle brigade! I have also been looking at getting some sliders, but I cannot work out where on the bike they might be fitted. I want some 'crash bars,' too, but their fitting is more obvious. I would like to fit the sliders somewhere that would give some protection to the exhaust pipes, but where , is the problem. Thanks again for your kind and helpful words. Best. Steve.
     
  7. steviecat

    steviecat New Member

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    Brilliant, Terry! That's exactly what I'm needing. Thanks very much :)
     
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