Jim's $400.00 1986 VF500F

Discussion in '1st & 2nd Generation 1983-1989' started by Jim McCulloch, Jun 25, 2019.

  1. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    Rode the vf400 & the cbr. Cbr won hands down especially in the wet.
     
  2. Jim McCulloch

    Jim McCulloch New Member

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    I also rode both the VF500 and CBR600 brand new and I have to admit the CBR600 was a really nice bike and possibly better than the VF500. BUT....since it was a new bike I never got to push it hard just up and down the street to test ride it for putting it on the floor. I did get to ride the CBR1000 also and I thought it a pig, though I never got to ride a VF1000R so I have no idea how it compared. We could not get the owner to order a VF1000R because we had a hell of a time selling the (1) (84?)VF1000F Interceptor we got. I think it sat for a year or more before we sold it off the floor.

    Had not thought about this stuff in ages....Memories!
     
  3. RllwJoe

    RllwJoe Member

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    I rode a friend's vf500 for a day back when I owned a '85 VF700s "Sabre". It was two years between that and when I purchased the first CBR600F model in '87. I owned and rode the "Hurricane 600" for five years before selling it. I hated having to sell that bike.

    Hard to remember that far back, and a two year compairison.... What I do remember is that the VF500 was a lot lighter than my "Sabre", and the "Hurricane" was a lot lighter also. The power was noticeably less going from the 700 to the 500, however, the difference in weight from the 700 to the 600 was very noticeable and the power seemed to be equal between the 700 and 600. The V4 power bands are wider and the CBR was a lot of fun with the RPM's in the upper scale. That being said, the CBR 600 was "buzzy" below about 7000 RPM and smooth above. If I had to choose between the two, it would have to come down to track bike or commuter. My opinion would be the CBR600 to be the track bike, in large part because the chassis is very stiff using the engine as a main part of the frame. The VFR 500 would then be the commuter of the two because it's wide power band is better suted for around town riding (but only slightly).
     
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  4. Jim McCulloch

    Jim McCulloch New Member

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    Yeah the CBR600 was definitely the bike of choice for the track back then. The Kawasaki Ninja 600 was the bike everyone had at the track previously and the CBR600 I thought blew the Kaw away. I did see several people racing the VF500 though and it did OK until the straightaways. The 600's ate it's lunch on top speed, hardly surprising. There were so many CBR600's out there being ridden by novice riders in the late 80's we actually stocked body parts for them they got crashed so often!
     
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  5. jeremyr62

    jeremyr62 New Member

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    The CBR600 was a huge success in the UK. Honda then developed it and definitely pushed the quality up as the years passed. Sort of single handedly made the sporty 600 class a thing, although I think the GPZ600R (Ninja) preceded it.
     
  6. Jim McCulloch

    Jim McCulloch New Member

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    Back to the overhaul!

    Go the pivot axle from the swing arm finally removed, it took 2 days of soaking in penetrating oil to be able to punch it out. Surprisingly the needle bearings in the pivot points were still ok.

    IMG_9407.JPG

    I also ended up having the correct lubricant on my shelf. Not sure where I got it but glad I had it. MolyKote G-n from the Helms Honda manual

    IMG_9406.JPG
     
  7. Jim McCulloch

    Jim McCulloch New Member

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    It Lives! Got it back together enough to start it with an auxiliary gas tank. It smoked pretty good for a bit but it actually settled down to a 1000 or so RPM. with some barely seen smoke. Hard to believe it is running on less than 100 PSI on the cylinders. I idled it for about 10 minutes and the smoke got way less. I did notice some blow by smoke from the crankcase hose but it was not bad. I guess I will just keep moving on this restoration and just live with the engine compression for now. The radiator fan came on also so that is good. YAY!
     
  8. Captain 80s

    Captain 80s Insider

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    Don't get caught up in the "numbers". If it runs good, it runs good. You'll know after the first couple rides. Get some miles on her and bet she doesn't smoke or blowby at all. Then do another oil change and ride.

    But always keep your eye out for that spare engine deal.
     
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