Just bought my First RC36.. Tools question

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by SteveWJ, Jul 15, 2020.

  1. SteveWJ

    SteveWJ New Member

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    Hi Guys & Gals
    Glad to join the community! Just bought my first VFR, its being delivered in 10 days!!! excited :)

    I was wondering .. I have sets of metric and imperial sockets and spanners, for a 1995 VFR 750 FS RC 36 are there any specialist tools I should get. For instance do I need JIS sockets and spanners (wrenches)?

    I remember watching a guy on Youtube restoring his CB750 and he said JIS tools were essential, wondered if it was the same for a VFR?

    Also, should I buy any specific tools for specific jobs on this bike outside of wrenches and sockets

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Captain 80s

    Captain 80s Member

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    Some JIS screwdrivers can be nice. You can also blunt the ends of normal philips drivers for similar results (so they don't bottom out before fully engaging). Other than that, metric sockets and wrenches. Special tools can be needed for certain service jobs, but just cross those bridges as needed.

    Oh, and welcome!
     
  3. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    Welcome aboard Steve! Does the bike come with the stock tool kit? Important part is the C spanner that adjusts the eccentric on the rear hub for chain tension. You could resort to a screwdriver that you have a hate affair with and a hammer of your choice to knock the adjuster to the correct position for chain tightness (in all honesty, I have used the above method once or twice without mauling up stuff.)

    Good quality 6 point metric sockets in 3/8 drive with a ratchet of your choice, later down the road you could accumulate 1/4 inch drive 6 point sockets along with a ratchet of your choice and some extensions. You don't need JIS screwdrivers to work on these bikes. And who calls them spanners anymore? You from across the pond? Obviously your gona need some nice wrenches in Metric flavours, boxed end/open end are common. When you get more advanced you can get some ratcheting closed end wrenches in various flavours 8-14 MM is a good start.

    A good DMM w0uld be useful for electrical testing etc. You going to have the carburetors synchronized eventually and either you or the person doing it is gona have a manometer. I have one without actual mercury in it (out-lawed now they have synthetic crap which sucks) Its a technical thing and I can do it in five minutes because I know where to look and have special right angle screw driver that gets on the adjusters quickly and efficiently. Otherwise you could be pulling your hair out and cussing like a lori driver.

    Cheers and post some pictures :worthless: Peace
     
  4. bk94si

    bk94si Member

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    You need a giant socket to remove the rear axle. If it hasn't been replace before, the cush rubbers will probably be hard as rocks or disintegrated.

    And I differ on the JIS screwdrivers. You totally need them unless you like stripping the heads of screws.

    A nice set of t-handled hex wrenches is nice also.
     
  5. SteveWJ

    SteveWJ New Member

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    Haha ! yeah Im a limey, thanks for the tips, yes it has the full original tool kit. All the original stickers, even the second key still has its original Honda tag attached! Bit of a Gem really, owned by a top bloke with a workshop full of toys, clearly knows how to look after a bike. Its bone stock, never been dropped, and its running like a swiss watch. He's already balanced the carbs, and the only thing it needs is the rear wheel bearing which has a tiny amount of play. I've got a tool cabinet with with 3/8 and 1/4 sockets and ratchets, and " wrenches" in metric and imperial, so sounds like Im good to go, although I would like to upgrade them to a better quality set, like Snap on over time. I think i may have a manometer in a box somewhere from when I bought a CB 550F .. which turned out had a bent frame and like an idiot I sold it as we were moving from the Uk to Spain .. hindsight is a marvellous thing LOL.
     
  6. SteveWJ

    SteveWJ New Member

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  7. SteveWJ

    SteveWJ New Member

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    Thanks, I need to do the rear wheel bearing so might be needing one of those. If Honda used JIS, i think that's the way to go. Any recommendation of which set of sizes to get, I'll start looking for those as I want to take all the plastics off to begin with so I can see everything properly and if nothing else give everything a good clean. Think the T handled wrenches will need to go on my Christmas list.. they're not cheap
     
  8. SteveWJ

    SteveWJ New Member

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    Thanks for the welcomes and the advice. Realised I should probably have posted a pic. So here she is .. being delivered a week on Sat.
    my new bike.jpg
     
    Keager likes this.
  9. SteveWJ

    SteveWJ New Member

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    Now just need to find the single-seat cowl
     
  10. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    Bike looks good, you sure the rear needs a wheel bearing? They are pretty robust units, could be your nut that has the stake on it on the hub side loosened up. It takes a large torque figure I know, I had one lose a while back. To do the rear wheel bearing on these style bikes, is a fairly large job (read-crappy.) You need to remove the swing arm and press out the old bearing (I am 99% sure on this one, but I could be wrong.)

    Really, when it comes down to phillip head JIS screw drivers, what do you need them for? 4 screws on the master cylinder covers? Carburetor screws? Number 2 screwdrivers work ok and the tips don't get buggered up, thats just me though.
     
  11. raYzerman

    raYzerman Insider

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    Blunted Phillips works better (and OK) than non-blunted Phillips, but JIS trumps that. Go professional if you can.
     
  12. Captain 80s

    Captain 80s Member

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    I have both drivers and on some screws it makes a big difference. Like the master cylinder cap screws mentioned above. But my ratcheting t-handle Snap-On drivers have still been the ones that gets the stubborn screw plenty of times.
     
  13. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    if you need to do any work on the carbs then JIS are the way to go. Or you can just use maul grips to undo the screws..
     
  14. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    You know, I just had a brain storm - They give you screwdrivers in the cheesy plastic tool kit, I have used the tip with the cheesy handle once or twice in my career. I have a square ratcheting handled designed to open gas bottles, the ribes on the screwdriver shank fit perfectly in that tool. Using some pressure pliers on the sides of the screw head work well (vice-grips = pressure pliers btw.) There are lots of ways to skin a cat, or in my case an iguana. I wish I could take a picture of my screw driver drawer just to illustrate how sick I get with the thought of buying/finding a new type of screwdriver LOL pictures uploaded. NuffSed
     

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  15. raYzerman

    raYzerman Insider

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    Hint, small 1/4" drive manual impact driver a valuable tool in the arsenal.
     
  16. SteveWJ

    SteveWJ New Member

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    Great thanks, all very useful. Yes you were right, as the seller is an experienced mechanic, he checked it, and it was simply in need of adjustment to take out the tiny amount of slack, luckily not the bearing itself. I think from watching a rebuild of a couple of 70's bike.. CB 750 73 i think, I got the idea that Honda had stuck with those.. guess things moved on.
     
  17. ridervfr

    ridervfr Member

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    Nice, I love happy endings, took my 93 out the other day, merged onto the highway, was in fifth and did not shift into sixth until 120mph, up to 145mph and settled down to a nice galloping 95mph or so for my 45 mile trip. Peace
     
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