Learned something about comfort today

Discussion in 'General VFR Discussions' started by RobVG, Sep 29, 2018.

  1. RobVG

    RobVG Member

    Country:
    Canada
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2013
    Messages:
    1,434
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Seattle
    Map
    When i first got my VFR I had to learn how to ride it. It wasn't like My RD 350, light and quick turning. The Yamaha was like a bicycle with a rocket engine. My 550 Seca was a more civilized ride. Anyone could ride it. I ended up racing it after the RD blew up and it was forgiving, considering it was being flogged by a Novice.

    Next bike, 23 years later, was the 700 i brought 4 years ago. It was a big change. Much heavier. Took awhile to get used to coming up to a stop sign. It also seemed to require more counter steering and weight shifting. Same with the VFR. Once i figured out the VFR didn't like to be shifted below 5k it was Smooth sailing.

    And now to the comfort bit. I always had a death grip on the bars. I knew i was doing it. It took mental discipline and a long time to lose my white knuckles. The other problem i have is halving my weight on my arms. It makes me get tired easily. Other riders here on VFRWorld told me i need to use my "core" to take the weight off the arms. Yeah, it works but it's a struggle to remember to do it.

    Tonight i figured out my problem. My shoulders are hunched and tight. When i lowered my shoulders the weight came off my arms and my core kicked in automatically, without thought. I think i can probably ride father now in comfort but i still need to make it a habit. Most of you probably have figured this out already but right now, im a much happier camper.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
  2. OZ VFR

    OZ VFR Member

    Country:
    Australia
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2013
    Messages:
    1,166
    Likes Received:
    365
    Trophy Points:
    128
    Location:
    Old Toongabbie, Australia
    Map
    When in the twisties, try "dropping your shoulder".
    Moving it forward into the corner and down, this also forces you to take the weight of the bars.
    I find it harder to relax once I've been on the bike for the whole day as I get tired and lazy.
    I'm 55 and still learning new things about my bike and riding, and I'm no slouch.
     
    XRedJar likes this.
  3. fink

    fink Member

    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,439
    Likes Received:
    414
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Ardnamurchan Penninsula, Scotland
    Map
    From someone who has done a bit of racing i'm surprised to read that.
    Loose grip on bars ideally aiming to do near enough OKays (thumb and forefinger gripping other fingers loose)
    Shoulders and elbows relaxed you should be able to do chicken wings, flap your elbows.
    A bit of weight on pegs as opposed to just resting your feet. In bends push off on the outside foot and dip inside shoulder.

    Select you underwear carefully as seams in odd places cause pressure. if your starting to get a numb bum ,squeeze your cheeks to keep circulation going and ease muscles as well as shift position.
     
  4. James Bond

    James Bond Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dixie
    Map
    Your core muscles have to be very strong to ride twisties all day. Find the position on the seat where you can relax your upper body. That position will depend somewhat on how tall you are (or upper torso length). Once you're positioned correctly, the VFR can actually become very flickable in spite of it's weight. Keep practicing. Try E0 gas for more power which can make the bike feel lighter.
     
  5. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

    Country:
    Canada
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,128
    Likes Received:
    1,141
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Chilliwack, BC Canada
    Map
    Good habits are as hard to acquire as bad ones are to loose. It will take a lot of concentration for a considerable period of time. Generally speaking, to break a bad habit takes about three months. I would think to acquire a good one will take a similar amount of time practising the habit. Once you have that driving habit, you should have it for life.

    I learned many good driving habits in boot camp that are still with me to this day. Without even thinking of it. That was back in 1978. I still catch myself every time I make a lane change thinking "Mirrors, Signal, Shoulder check, Eyes front, Lane change." We had to recite this out loud during our driving classes or the corporal would have a shit fit on you.
     
    XRedJar and James Bond like this.
  6. James Bond

    James Bond Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dixie
    Map
    More people need to go through boot camp to learn to drive it appears. And for goodness sakes, never use the lane change signal!!
     
  7. VFR4Lee

    VFR4Lee Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2016
    Messages:
    1,040
    Likes Received:
    479
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Reseda / LA
    Map
    Comfort begins with my ass. The seat should be not too hard, not too soft, just right.
    Also, I am not a monkey humping a football, I want to sit up and beg.
    Which was why I put handlebars on my VFR, and one reason I like my current Monster. Woof! :Peace:
     
    A.M likes this.
  8. OZ VFR

    OZ VFR Member

    Country:
    Australia
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2013
    Messages:
    1,166
    Likes Received:
    365
    Trophy Points:
    128
    Location:
    Old Toongabbie, Australia
    Map
    I agree, riding a VFR without handlebars would be really uncomfortable. :Eyebrows:
     
    A.M, RllwJoe and 34468 Randy like this.
  9. James Bond

    James Bond Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dixie
    Map
    Not saying you're wrong for you but your ass becomes less vulnerable to discomfort if your core and leg muscles are strong enough to not need your ass to support much weight on the VFR. We're all built different. My arms support next to none of my weight and my ass not enough to matter (it's moving around constantly in the twisties which is where I ride) thus they don't hurt after a long ride. My bars and pegs are stock.
     
  10. rich stone

    rich stone New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Im a little old (?) (66yo & 130 lb) guy. A sport bike in tight twistys or on the track doesnt bother me at all but 10 miles on the open road is torture.

    My vfr with stock setup was a 200 mile bike. With sargent seat, bar risers and new screen in is a 700 mile machine. But my vstrom or norton are easilt good for 800 plus mile days.

    The point is set up and personal conditioning are everything. Soomeone above mentioned shorts and if you are planning to ride all day it is a real consideration as are your pants. Wrangler jeans have large seams that applie pressure, levis do not.

    (I also have a RD hot rod that weighs 195 pounds wet but switching to the vfr takes less than a block.)
     
  11. Zapp

    Zapp New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2018
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Boston
    Map
    Since getting my VFR I've been mindful of engaging my core and legs and not putting weight on the grips as everyone mentioned. The place where I always revert to using my arms is riding around town. I don't know if it's the amount of traffic or traffic signals and signs but I ride tighter for lack of a better word.
     
  12. James Bond

    James Bond Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dixie
    Map
    Stiffening upper body and arms usually means lack of confidence and is a natural (but dangerous) defense mechanism on a bike that is polar to safe riding body characteristics. If not relaxed in th eenvironment either don't ride there or practice being relaxed for much better bike control. There are places I won't ride because I can't relax there or in the situations they present.
     
  13. Justin Robichaud

    Justin Robichaud New Member

    Country:
    Canada
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2018
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Canada
    Map
    Try squeezing the tank with your thighs occasionally, it's a trick my dad taught me. Our legs are typically the most conditioned, and you'd be surprised the amount of weight it takes off your wrists/arms. I try to make a habit of it; especially on longer, straighter, hauls.

    Side note: my next big purchase for her is gonna be a Corbin though haha.
     
    James Bond likes this.
  14. James Bond

    James Bond Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dixie
    Map
    Without having "better than most people's core muscle strength" or being overweight, you're never going to get comfortable on a VFR without having pain or poor riding skills. It takes intentional strengthening effort to make the core muscles strong. Being significantly overweight is...you know who's fault..... Been doing it for years and am racketing it up more. Riding a VFR in poor health and strength is not wise or safe.
     
  15. Zapp

    Zapp New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2018
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Boston
    Map
    I thought about what you wrote and while it's good advice I don't think it applies in my case. I'm certainly not lacking confidence riding the bike around town and I'm plenty relaxed. I think it has more to do with the density of traffic in the Boston area and having to stop/start so frequently that has me rocking forward onto my grips. Regardless, I can definitely work on my riding posture as this is the first bike I've owned that is this aggressive in ergonomics.
     
  16. John carnahan

    John carnahan New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2018
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Springfield, WV
    Map
    Comfort is relative. Except for a year on a stock GSXR1000 along with the SV, I've been riding the stock 01 SV650S for 14 years and 50K miles. 300 miles is all I could ever stand. I rode my new 91 VFR750 about 50 miles yesterday for the first time and felt Like it was made for me. That said, as long as the levers are set at the correct angle the only thing that ever bothers me is my neck after a couple 100 miles. My right hand gets tired on any bike I've ridden after a while...maybe try adding something to it? I do have a Corbin seat on the SV. Time will tell if the stock VFR seat will work?

    BTW, right after I bought the GSXR1000 my grandson was born just over 200 miles away and I decided to saddle-up and go see him.(I should have taken the SV) After 365 miles into the round trip I stopped at the Sideling Hill rest stop on I68 and almost called Marcia to bring the truck to haul us the rest of the 40 or so miles home......:Plane: That was 14 years ago when I was only 58

    Jack
     
  17. fink

    fink Member

    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,439
    Likes Received:
    414
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Ardnamurchan Penninsula, Scotland
    Map

    Start stop traffic is not good on anybike with a forward lean,full stop. As bikes are designed for the open road, not sitting in a traffic light queue. The advice will work to an extent but you also need to be moving.

    I lost count of the number of conversations with RR riders who complain of the problem only to find that 95 % of their riding is done within city limits at slower than the marked speed.
     
    John carnahan likes this.
  18. James Bond

    James Bond Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dixie
    Map
    I get that. There's no way I could relax in that kind of traffic. I avoid even light traffic. I do relax in some of the most challenging twisties in the country every time I ride. I live in them. We're all used to different things.
     
Related Topics

Share This Page