Motorcycle Camping Gear

Discussion in 'Gear & Accessories' started by Norse, Jan 29, 2020.

  1. Norse

    Norse New Member

    Country:
    Denmark
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    55
    Trophy Points:
    28
    As I was going through my gear in preparation for the new season, I got to wondering what people use for their MC camping trips.
    It's always interesting to compare our different approaches and maybe get some new ideas.

    Personally, I prefer to travel light. So my basic gear list looks like this:

    Tent: Snugpak Ionosphere.
    Sleeping: Different Snugpak models depending on weather and a light weight inflatable air mattress.
    Cooking: Ultra light mini gas stove, 800ml "fast boil" pot and a folding handle frying pan.

    All of fits in a small roll bag that I can strap to the back of the bike without any need for panniers.
    I actually always keep that bag packed so I am always ready to go if I should get the urge.

    How do you guys handle MC camping?
     
  2. FJ12rydertoo

    FJ12rydertoo Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    2,058
    Likes Received:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Platte City, MO
    Map
    A 40' fifth wheel toyhauler. LOL

    These old bones don't take to camping much anymore. :)
     
  3. fink

    fink Member

    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    381
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Ardnamurchan Penninsula, Scotland
    Map
    Jet boil for my days away. Don't really do camping.
     
  4. reg71

    reg71 Poser Staff Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    9,642
    Likes Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    108
    Location:
    Atascadero, California, United States
    Map
    I keep it pretty light. Think backpacker. I pretty much started with the cheapest stuff and then tried moto-camping to make sure I'd do it. there's nothing worse than buying a whole lot of gear and not using it regularly. Once I had gone with my cheap gear a few times, i started gradually replacing it with better lighter stuff. I can now pack for 3 days in a giant loop that's approx 39 liters.

    My gear list is:

    Kelty 2 person tent https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NFCFR80/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Teton lightweight sleeping bag: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B007JTLKCC/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    A Klymit Sleeping Pad: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LGAQ7NW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    An inflatable pillow: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B071FQJV82/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    and inflatable solar lantern: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07LF7YWMG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    headlamp from coleman I think.

    standard cook set similar to this: https://smile.amazon.com/Redneck-Co...d=1&keywords=camp+cook&qid=1580327793&sr=8-25

    I usually just grab food the day I'm leaving and it varies between freeze dried or MREs to occasionally just some canned stuff.

    I do have a camp chair, but I don't always take it: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07DYKZP8P/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    this is my stove(It's tiny and has been working fine for years): https://smile.amazon.com/Etekcity-U...C4QBY1W66P2&psc=1&refRID=RD4B3GP06C4QBY1W66P2

    And i forgot this yesterday, but i usually take this cooler: https://smile.amazon.com/Polar-Bear...nylon+cooler+12+pk&qid=1580407261&sr=8-1&th=1


    I wear short boots so I can walk in them, but often i take flip flops so I can let my feet cool off more. My tent has a footprint and an attic for storing stuff, and I usually have a book or an ipad or soemthing, but that's mostly it.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 30, 2020
    zombie likes this.
  5. OOTV

    OOTV Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2011
    Messages:
    6,397
    Likes Received:
    897
    Trophy Points:
    143
    Location:
    Anaheim, Ca.
    It's been several years since I've been moto camping but I also try and pack as light and compact as I can. I have a top case and medium size saddle bags for when I do go. I typically bring my 2 man tent, a sleeping bag (good down to 4C, at least that's what it says on the bag). I do have an insert for the bag in case it gets a little colder or is too hot and I can use it by itself but in all honesty, I have not used it yet. I have a Jet Boil stove, a small mess kit and sleeping pad. Everything I carry, including change of clothes will fit in the top case and saddle bags.

    Here is the sleeping and cooking/eating gear. All of this fits in one of the saddle bags. The other bag holds my tent, ground pad and misc stuff (hammer, stakes, collapsible shovel, etc.). My top case is for my clothes and anything I want to "lock up" when I'm away from the bike.

    IMG_5534.jpeg

    IMG_5536.jpeg
     
  6. reg71

    reg71 Poser Staff Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    9,642
    Likes Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    108
    Location:
    Atascadero, California, United States
    Map
    By the way, since we are talking camping, the temp ratings on sleeping bags are a crock of shiite. That is just the temp you can survive with it. My 20 degree bag is not near warm enough when the temp is in the 30s. Even when inside my tent, I'm still chilly.
     
  7. Norse

    Norse New Member

    Country:
    Denmark
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    55
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Not sure about the US market, but here it's standard for sleeping bags to have two ratings: Comfort and Extreme.
    Extreme being survivable but unpleasant and comfort being the limit of comfortable unless you are the type to freeze easily.
    In my experience, these rating tend to be pretty accurate for quality sleeping bags.

    My spring/autumn bag has a comfort rating of 2C degrees. I have used it down to those temperatures on several occasions and never been cold.
    My winter bag has a comfort rating of -20C. I have literally woken up with it covered in snow (wasn't expecting snow so didn't pitch the tent), and still been perfectly comfortable. I basically never use it anymore, because it's too warm and even in winter, my spring/autumn bag plus a silk liner is almost always enough.

    Your choice of tent and pad makes a huge difference as well. A crappy pad won't insulate you properly from the ground and if your tent is too large, it is hard to heat. That is actually half the reason I prefer my Ionosphere. It's large enough to fit me and all my gear comfortably, but small enough to not trap a ton of cold air.
     
  8. reg71

    reg71 Poser Staff Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    9,642
    Likes Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    108
    Location:
    Atascadero, California, United States
    Map
    That is all true. I debated a smaller tent, but ended up with a 2 person so I can bring my gear in if I like. I usually end up either reading or watching vids on the tablet some before falling asleep so I like being able to sit up if I want. If I was going to camp in 30 degree F weather a lot I'd prob move to a warmer bag and smaller tent, but for the most part I don't do it so it's not worth extra investment.
     
  9. Mad Doctor

    Mad Doctor New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2018
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Utah
    Map

    Been thinking about camping and this has come in handy. Some of these seem like duplicates. Which would you recommend for a first timer at camping?
     
  10. reg71

    reg71 Poser Staff Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    9,642
    Likes Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    108
    Location:
    Atascadero, California, United States
    Map
    Get a cheap tent and sleeping bag. Try goodwill or craigslist. The stove and inflatable lamp or so cheap you may as well. Find some type of air mattress used if possible but buy the klymit or similar if not. If you go 3x and like it, upgrade tent and bag. If on dirt bike instead of adv, then maybe consider bevy or hammock tent for size weight. But I really like having my own “room” which is the illusion of a tent.
     
    Dennyf likes this.
  11. Norse

    Norse New Member

    Country:
    Denmark
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    55
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I don't entirely agree with this strategy. But don't entirely disagree either.

    I definitely feel that you should not invest heavily in something until you are sure it's for you, and that your investment will be worth it. But at the same time, saving a bit too much in the beginning, can easily end up being just as bad of an investment.
    I know several people who say they hate camping because they tried it and it was a bad experience. Turns out they tried it with really cheap gear and ended up being cold or too hot because of a crappy sleeping bag or getting wet because of a used tent that hadn't been properly cared for. When just starting out (especially when trying to save a buck) people rarely know what to look for and how to tell if something is actually a good deal and not just cheap.

    You don't need to spend $500+ to get a good, solid tent. But spending $50,- is not likely to get you anything worth having.
    My preferred tent (Snugpak Ionosphere) is only about $230,-. It will stand up to anything but the most extreme weather and last you a lifetime with proper care. There is even a cheaper, more civilian focused version (Journey Solo), which is only $150,- and while not quite the same standard, will still be more than enough for most people.
    The same brand has a range of sleeping bags (Travelpak series) that are excellent quality and only $50-$80,-.
    So for less than $200,- you could get a good quality tent and sleeping bag (summer bag for that price) that you can trust and which would be less than 6lbs combined, and easily fit on any bike.

    As for a pad. This is actually one place where you can go super cheap. For years, the standard option for ultra light hiking, was those $5,- inflatable pool mats. They pack very small, weight almost nothing and work perfectly well in the warmer months and not too harsh conditions. Just make sure to get the kind that has individually inflatable chambers. That way, it will still be usable even if one of them gets punctured.

    My point is that you don't have to spend a fortune, but trying to save too much, is likely to just result in a bad experience and never wanting to do it again.
    And think of it this way. If you go on vacation and the hotel is not as good as you had hoped, you may have spent 100's of $ more than you needed for for what you got, and have nothing to show for it.
    If you spend a bit more for decent camping gear and don't like camping after all, you will at least have a decent tent and sleeping bag that you can either keep, give away or sell.
     
    Diving Pete likes this.
  12. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2016
    Messages:
    1,382
    Likes Received:
    421
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    London
    Map
    Having camped on a few trips, if you have too small a tent it makes it more work especially if its raining. The other reason is security.
    Now 1 of the reasons I love the VFR is its 3 hard bag system. If you can't get it all in there then you are doing it wrong.

    Comfort is everything after a week in the saddle. A good sleeping bag is essential & will last years. An inflatable sleeping mat also helps with the comfort. The more comfortable you are the better the trip you will have.

    Sometimes knowing when NOT TO CAMP is just as important - crappy areas, crappy weather & so taking some spare cash / credit card for those possibilities also helps with the trip.
     
    Norse likes this.
  13. Norse

    Norse New Member

    Country:
    Denmark
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    55
    Trophy Points:
    28
    My basic rule is that I want the tent to comfortably fit the number of people sleeping in it and their helmets, boots and anything you can't/won't leave on the bike.
    Any more than that is wasted space that adds unnecessary weight and bulk.
    But yes, you can easily fit everything you need for 2 people on a bike. For one person, I don't even bother with the hard luggage and just throw my roll bag on the rear.

    You are right about knowing when and where to camp. Most people would not enjoy hard camping in rough conditions and harsh weather. Personally, I do like that. But I have the gear and experience to ensure that I am ready for the conditions.
    I have done 2 one-month long trips in winter (January and February). One of them in Eastern Europe. Even with good gear, experience and proper preparation, it takes its toll. And on both, I planned one night a week at a hotel, to "recharge", do laundry etc. That little bit of "luxury" makes all the difference.

    Anyone new to camping, should definitely start a bit slower. Use proper camp sites and not plan trips more than a few days to begin with. That way, you also learn a bit about what gear you actually need, and what you can leave at home. You don't want to realize that you are missing some small but essential bit of kit, when you are 300 miles from civilisation, in a forest at 2am.
     
  14. Mad Doctor

    Mad Doctor New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2018
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Utah
    Map
    Thanks for the tips guys. These are definitely words of wisdom.
     
Related Topics

Share This Page