New to riding needs advice.

Discussion in 'General VFR Discussions' started by konrad unold, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. fatbastard

    fatbastard New Member

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    Hi Konrad,

    welcome to the forum. As you say, destiny has found you. You can spend months checking specs and doing research, but buying bikes involves the heart as much as the head. If you love the bike, there's a good chance you'll end up owning it regardless of the research. The VFR800 is one of the best all rounders ever made, so you're not going to go very far wrong there anyway. There are small differences between the different generations but they are all very good bikes. Being a newish rider, you may find that the bike is quite a bit heavier than you are used to and the V four motor has a bit of weight up high too which means you need to use good technique for low speed maneuvering and be fairly firm and committed when making low speed turns.

    It is quite a big jump in power and weight coming from the 125s but there are plenty of guys on here who have started on the VFR and while they have plenty of power available, the power delivery is less savage than on some light weight sports bikes. You get to choose how much to open the throttle. The best advice I was given when I started riding was "keep your wrist down" at least until you have a good feel for the bike. "Keep your head up" and "look where you want to go" were the other two.

    The bike you have found is a VTEC model, that just means that it has some clever mechanical gizmos that take two valves out of service at low revs that gives a bit more torque and better fuel economy when running around town and helped Mr Honda meet the noise and emission regs too. When the revs get up higher the other valves come back into service and you get more power. It's a little like a turbo cutting in but milder. It happens a bit over 6000 rpm and until you get used to it, that may give you a little start if it happens mid corner and may unsettle you and the bike. It really isn't an issue and you will get used to it very quickly. If you want to avoid it in the corner it's a simple matter of choosing a suitable gear so you are either comfortably below or a little above the cut in point.

    I hope you enjoy the new bike and stay safe.
     
  2. scottbott

    scottbott New Member

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    I have a fourth gen bike and it is heavy as I havent had a bike since the mid 90's so not used to it the hard bit I find is the gravel drive way we have and me being a short arse it is a job 'paddling' my way on it or turning it around on the gravel to reverse it into the garage, just go careful with it, getting to on the main stand I struggle with as well,while I am here I would like to ask a question, if the bike is on the main stand will a front paddock stand be ok to use? or do I need a rear one as well, hope I have not hijacked your post, enjoy your bike
     
  3. fatbastard

    fatbastard New Member

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    If it's on the center stand, why do you want a paddock stand too ?
     
  4. scottbott

    scottbott New Member

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    if I want to remove the front wheel and did not want to risk the bike falling if the front paddock stand was 'too high' for the centre stand to cope with height difference, if that makes sense
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2017
  5. fatbastard

    fatbastard New Member

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    It shouldn't be an issue for the center stand, but always worth proceeding with caution with new gear or using old gear in a new way. Plenty of people would use the centerstand instead of a rear paddock stand for this.
     
  6. scottbott

    scottbott New Member

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    thanks for that I was hoping it would be ok as that saves a few bob, want to get the wheels powder coated during the winter, where about are you on the central coast? mate of mine lives in Gosford,I used to live in Newcastle,great place, glad I got an Australian passport when I left to come back to the UK,strange thing is everytime I go back to see the kids as soon as land it 'feels' if I am where I belong cannot describe how or why, love the place
     
  7. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    Put bike on centre stand, place jack or bricks under the engine block to get the front wheel off the ground, remove wheel. Plenty safe.
     
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  8. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Pretty much what Diving Pete said works. As long as the bike is on level ground, just put the bike on the main stand and then put a heavy sack of sand on the pillion seat which will tip the back wheel down firmly on the ground and lift the front wheel clear of the ground and allow you to remove the front wheel. The bike will sit reasonably securely once you chock the rear wheel so it cannot move. If you going to be applying a lot of force to release bolts etc - maybe ease them off before putting the bike on the stand.
     
  9. RVFR

    RVFR Member

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    Wow, late to the party I am here In that guess it wouldn't matter what I brought now to the table. ;) Good on you for finding a gem of a VFR.. BUT??
     
  10. konrad unold

    konrad unold New Member

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    Gentlemen and ladies. Ladies and gentlemen.
    Please meet the brand new vfr800 a6 owner.
    Just bought this babe. Paid in full as it was about half of my budget. Loads of money for upgrades and gear.

    Thank you kindly for the advice you all gave me.

    She's home now.

    Also I've got the indicator installed in case the charging is gone.
     

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  11. Samuel

    Samuel New Member

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    Looking Good Konrad! :)
     
  12. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Looks great Konrad - I really like that combined voltmeter and USB outlet. Very neat install. Have fun.

    SkiMad
     
  13. konrad unold

    konrad unold New Member

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    Hi Guys and Gals
    Few updates.
    PROS: Since the bike was well under my budget ive got some protective gear (all full leather) for myself, new battery and tires for my bike - just in case.
    Shes full OEM, the bike is in pristine condition and it looks like just driven out of the show room - ive been asked several times if shes brand new.
    BTW: British Police just moved from Pan European to VFR. Ive been stopped by coppers once as one of them decided to compare his bike with mine :) Hilarious situation as they didnt even ask me for any papers, just wanted to see the bike. They complained about the size and shape of the Police panniers and afterwards escorted me to work.
    Clutch biting point - its just perfect! The bandit ive been recently riding had it all wrong.
    Position of the back break - even though adjustable it was perfect from the get-go.
    The sound of the V4 engine! Thats just makes me aroused :) For a moment I was thinking about swapping the exhaust to carbon but im affraid that will change or destroy the low end of the roar so i dropped the idea :(

    Few Cons: First: im unable to put the bike on the central stand on my own. Im too weak or need to practice my technique. Second: my missus wont let me bring the bike to the living room! And i thought she loves me...

    Once again. Thank you for all the advice. Every, even the smallest thing ive noted and made a good use of it.
     
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  14. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    For putting a heavy bike onto the centerstand it really helps if:

    I. You use good technique,
    2. Be 7ft tall
    3. Weigh 240Ibs

    As most of us don't fit the last 2 you have to learn how to do it.

    This is a fair example..



    although this one is more informative..

     
  15. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Nice to hear you are enjoying your 6th Gen Konrad.

    Your encounter with the rossers is amusing - whilst Pans and BMWs were in widespread use, a while back the diplomatic escort teams moved to VFRs and soon found the stock pannier set was a bit too wide so they tend to use the slightly narrower slab sided panniers from another Honda model (deauville?) the downside is they have a lot less capacity and if you see how much emergency kit they have to lug around I can understand why they are unhappy downsizing from the huge storage capacity of the Pan.

    There is no avoiding it - these bikes are heavy, and the weight is high up. This is increased with a full fuel tank. Randy has a long score sheet to prove these bikes are very inclined to take a nap if you are not very cautious during slow moves.

    So if you really need to use the main stand then off load all the luggage and ideally get someone to help you shift the bike onto and off the main stand.

    One trick I have seen used to make it a bit easier, is to place a wide wooden plank onto the garage floor and then ride the front wheel up onto the end of the plank. Whilst this will only raise the bike up a small amount, it makes it easier to then put the main stand down.

    Skimad
     
  16. VFR4Lee

    VFR4Lee Member

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    No MotoGP hero shit, OK?! :D
     
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  17. VFR_Mike

    VFR_Mike New Member

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    This statement more than any other jumped out at me, when you have a "connection" that you're describing with your motorcycle, you know you've chosen the right bike. The oneness and continuity with your bike will make the rides more enjoyable, and infinitely more safe when you know what your bike is doing, and it becomes an extension of yourself.

    Life is too short to fight with a bike that you're just not comfortable on - and I'm not talking about ergonomics. You know when you "feel it".

    Stay safe Konrad, and welcome to the club.
     
  18. mofo

    mofo New Member

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    Glad to hear your bike found you Konrad.
    I hear you have issues putting it on the center stand? Practice makes it perfect.
    Yours truly is 5.4" 137 lbs, and can do it just fine without any help. You can do it too, I have faith in you.
     
  19. John White

    John White New Member

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