Old biker from Spain...

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Zarcone, Sep 17, 2019.

  1. Zarcone

    Zarcone New Member

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    Hello,
    It's great to arrive to the Best VFR Forum there is. I'm a new VFR fan and what can I say that hasn't been already said...surely nothing. I'm just experiencing the same emotion many of you will have had when introduced to a Wonderfull machine. It's also going to ba a machine I will collect, and experience to have different models which I will personalize. I've had plenty bikes; I've resorted quite a few and only kept 2...a BMW R100CS and a Moto Guzzi 1000...of which I'm quite proud.

    https://guzzistas.mforos.com/1408239/11363672-cafe-pacer-60s-rosso-vino/

    ....but I have never felt the degree of engineering involved in creating a VFR...ever. Can you believe I take off the exhaust muffler and put it on practically every other day!
    On certain moments I want to hear the mechanical winning of the cam gears and on other the roar of the exhaust. I don't get tired of finding an excuse to use it and we have an incredible climate here in Madrid so I can use her a lot!
    I could drag on for hours...just sorry I didn't meet a VFR 25 years ago! I have a lot of catching up to do.
    Regards to all and thank you for creating such a great Forum.

    PS excuse tipos and my rusty English
     
  2. weevee

    weevee New Member

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    Nice Guzzi Zarcone!

    I ride a Guzzi Daytona-engined Magni as well as my 5th-gen VFR, and the difference couldn't be more pronounced. They both have their unique qualities, but each time I climb off the Magni and onto the VFR, I feel like I've found a magic-carpet to ride! Guzzis are so agricultural: they really are a blast from the past (..and for me, that's a good thing).

    Regarding the linked brakes on the VFR: I find both the lever and the footbrake pedal require more effort than I'd like. Use them hard, and the bike stops well - but there's very little initial effect if they're used gently. But how could it be otherwise? The 'link' front-to-rear is in part mechanical, so frictional losses play their part.

    The biggest benefit to the linked brakes (for me) is the ability to use the the footbrake hard without worry of locking up the rear (..whilst at the same time being able to 'blip' the throttle for gear-changing with an entirely free hand). Steep downhill hairpins are a pleasure too, when the right hand's throttle/lever workload is reduced, and you're more-or-less free to steer.

    Steve
     
  3. Thumbs

    Thumbs Member

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    Welcome Zarcone ...
     

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