Project VF500F2

Discussion in '1st & 2nd Generation 1983-1989' started by shields17, Jan 28, 2020.

  1. shields17

    shields17 New Member

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    Thanks both! Yeah the switches came up on eBay at a good price so it seemed silly not to.

    This turned out to not be entirely true... I was only getting power to the brake light switch when I had the other lights on. Solved pretty easily by separating two wires that were joined together on the CBR setup. I had wondered why everything still seemed to be working with 1 less wire than the original but now I know!

    I spent the rest of day finishing off the wiring fitting newly repainted indicators and put the clocks on the bike. As everything is now done at the back of the bike I've loosely fitted the tail fairing.

    [​IMG]

    Sadly the fairings are pretty beaten in places and are going to let the overall finish of the bike down, I think at some point I'll have to shell out and have them properly repaired and repainted. For now I'm going to try my best to repair what I can - fairing repair tips welcomed!
     
  2. straycat

    straycat New Member

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    Fairing & Panel repair isnt too hard. Cracks and missing pieces can be readily repaired with plastic welding. You can do plastic welding on the cheap with a soldering iron and some ABS rods off EBAY/Amazon or even use pieces of scrap fairing if you have them. Lots of videos on how to do that as well on Youtube. its pretty easy.

    Im a big fan of Plastex. lots of video's on youtube that will show yo what its capable of, but you can fix cracks, make missing tabs and lugs and even missing pieces of fairing if they not too big. Plastex is very good, but use it in a well ventilated area, pretty stinky solution tat im sure isnt good to breathe in.

    QBond is ok for some cracks, its like crazy glue.

    You can also make a repair paste from Acetone and ABS shavings, it also works quite well once the shavings dissolve in the acetone.

    Aside from that you can use glazing filler/putty to do the final finishing of the surface before you sand and prime it (I use a high build flex and fill primer for ABS)
     
  3. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    another fan of plastex. one thing to note. For replacement tabs and we all have those that are broken, its better to build it up in layers over a few days. This will be a lot stronger.
     
  4. shields17

    shields17 New Member

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    Thanks for the advice! Some of the results people show on YouTube of these methods look pretty impressive, definitely beyond what I expected to be possible. I'll keep watching the guides and then find a hidden away spot to practice. This is probably the worst part on the right hand lowers, I think someone's attempted to repair them in the past judging by the residue but its not held up at all.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Waylander

    Waylander New Member

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    You have to grind all that off, so you have a non oxidised surface to start from, you will start to see the difference between old plastic and stuff you can weld to, it will seem brutal but you have no choice

    I have done all mine with welding

    [​IMG]


    I prefer the ABS welding way, using rods off eBay, it’s faster and you have more control the acetone method is good but takes ages to harden off

    If you don’t own a Dremel it’s time to buy one and a pile of spare sanding drums


    VF1000F2F, in bits
     
  6. shields17

    shields17 New Member

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    I've just re-read the part of your thread where you were talking about your fairing repairs. They look brilliant now though!

    I've just bought a Dremel actually for a few other jobs, got loads of sanding drums this week too in an accessory kit I picked up pretty cheap from Lidl so it looks like they'll come in handy.
     
  7. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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    Sorry forgot to mention the dremal (or similar). It does help more than you think. Think I have a 9300...
    Use it to create the V required for cracks. For holes you do want to use fibreglass mesh to fill the main area. I bought the Master Tech kit as I knew I'd be using it a lot... lol
     
  8. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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  9. Diving Pete

    Diving Pete Insider

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  10. straycat

    straycat New Member

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    Too bad your not here close by, id fix that for free for you. I LOVE fixing ABS and plastic welding etc. It really isnt very difficult at all. Like others have said, make sure any old repairs and contaminants re dremmeled off before you attempt the fix.

    With plastic welding, you can also "stitch" (or Tack weld 1cm apart) the broken bits together first, that way its all joined up before you start welding and filling with the soldering iron and spare abs, that way you know your panel is properly aligned before you really get into it. If you try the welding approach its also helpful to weld and inch at one end of the crack and then an inch at the other end. Weld from both sides, but ensure the first side has cooled a bit before you weld the other side. Too much heat build up will warp your panel a bit. Its easier than it sounds and an old bit of abs to practice on is always useful. Now grab that soldering iron and have a go !

    While Plastex is a fantastic product, its not cheap (not sure if that matters to you or not), and since most folks have a soldering iron, welding is usually a very inexpensive option.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2020 at 11:33 AM
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