single vs. double

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by cstmvfrguy, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. fatso1277

    fatso1277 New Member

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    Okay cool. Thanks
     
  2. fatso1277

    fatso1277 New Member

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    Yep square gauges. upper fairing is RWB and the sides are white
     
  3. supertex

    supertex New Member

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    Are you going street fighter? or what?
     
  4. fatso1277

    fatso1277 New Member

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    naw going to try either CBR race fairing or 91 RVF fairing using NT650 kit. i have upper fairing stay for CBR, but really thinking NT650 kit from airtech will work. i saw a pics here where a guy used rc30 fairing in gallery i assume he used nt650 kit
     
  5. donald branscom

    donald branscom New Member

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    There is NO reason to have a single sided swing arm.
    In racing it could be easier to change wheels since you do not mess with the sprocket.

    The single sided swing arm has to be much beefier to try to get it to NOT TWIST.
    That can make the swing arm and all its components weigh MORE.
    A mono shock has to be bigger and stronger so no weight savings over two smaller shocks.
    With a single sided swing arm the pivot bearings are under a lot of stress because
    they are not just swinging up and down - but they are trying to twist at the same time.
    A regular swing arm is not trying to twist. It is much less resistant to twist.
    With a mono shock the space where the engine is located is complicated with the shock and links.
    It is much harder to change the shock on a single sided swing arm.
    Matter of fact with one shock on each side you can change one shock at a time, without even putting the bike on a stand.
     
  6. fatso1277

    fatso1277 New Member

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    Valid points i must say, but you gotta admit it does look bad ass on that 2nd gen vfr....
     
  7. supertex

    supertex New Member

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    I wouldn't say it was a major improvement over the stocker in performance, but there is definitely reasons to do it. If done properly it doesn't hurt the performance at all. Just looks Bad A$$.
     
  8. VF1000RS

    VF1000RS New Member

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    Old thread I know, but just got interested again and decided to reply to this comment since the comment was new to me. Seems strange coming from a guy who has put extended forks on a bike, more "twist", more leverage on the forks from the front wheel, longer wheelbase for slower turning, more stress on steering head bearings...

    The shock comments apply to all single shock machines, not specifically to the SSS. Any single shock is theoretically harder to change than a twin shock bike...

    My point?

    Don`t throw stones when you live in a glass house, etc.
     
  9. donald branscom

    donald branscom New Member

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    I was not throwing stones. I was talking about frame design and my opinions of single side swing arms and frames that wrap all around the engine VS. a double loop cradle frame that makes it easy to work on the bike.

    A chopper is not made to be efficient at all. It is all about attitude and looks ONLY.
    It is not a practical motorcycle.
     
  10. crustyrider

    crustyrider New Member

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    Don, I think what he is trying to say is something like this...... mods to a bike are not always correct . but if it works and is safe why bag on it..your chopper as you said is not efficient......its bad ass looking ...the SSSA conversion in your opinion is not practical but it looks bad ass. it is a safe modification so why bag on it?
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2010
  11. VF1000RS

    VF1000RS New Member

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    That`s pretty much it. The comment that there is no reason to have a SSS on a bike put me off. ELF designed it back in late 70`s-early 80`s on their endurance/racing machines with Honda backing. It was designed to expedite rear wheel changes.

    Putting one on another bike because you can, it works and it is cool are reasons enough. I seriously doubt that you or I will benefit from it`s quick removal in a race. I also seriously doubt you or I will be able to tell any real weight difference or notice any "twist".
     
  12. VFR1000R

    VFR1000R New Member

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    Just a suggestion and deviation from Cobalt Racings F2 wheel conversion. Instead of chopping and re-welding the stock caliper stay to make it shorter, use a first gen cbr600 (I think 1989) caliper stay. It has the correct distance to match the smaller F2 rear disc brake. All you have to do is machine it to accept the larger VFR / F2 axel. This is the method I used and have no torque arm clearance issues with a 160 tire. If you use a wider tire than a 160 you will have chain interference. Also there will be a slight offset with the F2 wheel due to the sprocket being located further out from centerline of the wheel compared to stock. My bike still tracks straight so no noticeable difference other than superior grip and turn in from the radial tire.
     
  13. Deadsmiley

    Deadsmiley Insider

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    I just saw this thread and I must say... Toecutter, you rock! This is very nicely done.

    I am a little embarrassed to admit that I never noticed the SSS on you '86 in your avatar pic. :rolleyes:
     
  14. TOE CUTTER

    TOE CUTTER Mullet Man

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    That is how I have always done it, just a couple of spacers and it will fit perfectly. Much easier way to get it on.
     
  15. crustyrider

    crustyrider New Member

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    :fish: .....
     
  16. evl_twn

    evl_twn New Member

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    Wow, that was a long time ago. Yeah, I gave up on the SSSA project when it looked like the chain was going to be too far outboard to the left, and it seemed like the wheel centerline was off center to the right. It's been a while since then, and I had my frame re-welded back to a center shock mount. I'm happy with the F2/F3 wheel setup on it now, but I still have the swingarm set up with the bearing spacers so I could revisit this mod at some point. Toecutter, what did you do about chain spacing on the left side? That's what caused me to rethink the whole process, it really didn't look like it was going to work. I've sold the white 5th gen rear wheel, I think if I was going to have another go at this I'd find a 3rd gen 8-spoke wheel. Here's the original page with pics:

    http://www.rc30.us/vfr.html
     
  17. willi777

    willi777 New Member

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    Had a custom 5/8" offset drive sprocket made (post #49)- also had to have the back-side of wheel milled 1.5-2mm to keep it centered
     
  18. BiKenG

    BiKenG New Member

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    Great thread and of current interest to me. But might I suggest a Ducati wheel? 916 and some other models use an offset about 2.5mm larger than Honda. So one of those wheels would be pretty good alignment and perfect with a simple spacer.

    A question though, From what you say, seems like the RC24 engine output sprocket must be closer to the centre of the bike than that of the RC46. Hence needing to space the front sprocket on the RC24 engine to match the offset of the RC46 rear end. Yes?
     
  19. Captain 80s

    Captain 80s Insider

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    ZOMBIE THREAD ALERT!
     
  20. BiKenG

    BiKenG New Member

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    I have to take issue with this. There are many reasons why someone may want a SSS/A, some of which will undoubtedly involve looks and style, something of which it appears donald branscom is not immune. I really don't see the point in throwing rocks at something like this just because you don't like it and...

    In any case your technical argument is actually flawed. Yes a SSS/A needs to be stiffer to resist the potential to twist, but that's how they are designed and manufactured so that they do (resist the twist). Which means that there is NO extra stress on the pivot bearings due to any twisting, because it doesn't. If it did, all those RC30s would have been all over the place instead of winning at the Isle of Man etc. Sorry, it is nonsense to suggest that there's more stress on those bearings due to it being a SSS/A. If the hub is rigidly connected to the pivot, it matters not how that connection is made, whether one side or both.

    No doubt it does mean a SSS/A weighs more than a dual sided arm would do for equivalent performance, but so what. Me, I love a SSS/A and am quite happy to trade off some small weight penalty in order to benefit from its advantages, AS THEY SUIT ME. You want to complain about heavy rear ends, you'd be better off ranting about all the shaft drive bikes out there. They really DO suffer from additional weight. But you know, I love a shaft drive when touring long miles. Horses for courses as they say.

    One other point. Someone opined that the RC24 S/A may not be up to the additional stress created by a wider tyre. Really? I very much doubt that. The limitation of how wide a tyre can be used is always just down to the available clearance. Never enough in my opinion. :)
     
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