VFR 1st bike, a predictably bad idea

Discussion in 'New Riders' started by FearIsGood, May 27, 2008.

  1. FearIsGood

    FearIsGood New Member

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    As of this weekend I am now the new owner of a bright red 03 VFR (vtec, abs). I had my friend bring the bike back to his house which is half an hour from mine. I got my sea legs back over the past few days putting their 250 ninja through it's paces. Sunday I get on the bike, wow grabby clutch . . . this thing wants to go. I even attempted flooring it in 2nd gear and quickly backed off for lack of courage. After the trips up and down the road I made it back home with only one stall and no other drama.

    Anyway, is this a good 'learner' bike? NO! I am going to be grannying this bike around for AWHILE. I was looking at SV's and Triumphs but for the distance/sport category I felt like I didn't have any other choice.

    All is safe, I'm geared up to a T and very respectful of the gobs of power this bike delivers. How quickly can I get into an MSF course is the next question...

    Love the forum, let me know if you're near the Central Ohio area!
     
  2. FearIsGood

    FearIsGood New Member

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    Oh, but I would like to add one thing.

    In a long list of bad ideas that I've had . . . this is definitely the best one :D
     
  3. Seattle

    Seattle New Member

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    You'll be surprised at how fast you get comfortable with that power.:wink:

    I've owned mine for about three months and we've become... let's just say we've been intimate at speeds in the triple digits on more than one occasion.:thumb:

    I finished up my MSF course a couple weeks ago, and highly suggest it.
     
  4. mello dude

    mello dude Member

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    Dude - wish you the best, good luck on your learning journey. I'm over in Dayton.

    MD
     
  5. junktionfet

    junktionfet New Member

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    True it probably isn't the best "learner bike" because the of the somewhat vague clutch and overall mass. However the smoothness makes the VFR forgiving, and the progressive brakes help a lot too. You'll be fine getting used to it, just remember everything you've learned about riding and she won't let you down.
     
  6. timothy wahl

    timothy wahl New Member

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    man that's a sweet 3rd gen! props on the white wheels! second that msf course!!!!! the course only taught me a couple of things ...what i really needed the most...im embarrassed to say...lmao....how to do a u-turn correctly....and how not to target fixate
     
  7. FearIsGood

    FearIsGood New Member

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    40 minute ride to work this morning. WOW, it makes me look forward to getting out of bed in the morning. No issues at stop lights or in bumper to bumper jams. I spent all of yesterday evening tooling around a parking lot, taking some back road curves, and hopping on and off deserted sections of high way.

    MSF courses are completely packed unfortunately, so I ordered the book in the meantime.
     
  8. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    I am surprised at the number of people who say this is not a good learning bike. My 06 is my first bike. I realize it had a lot of power and drove accordingly. I see you quickly came to the same conclusion. "IF" my son ever decides to take up riding, I have no problem with him learning on this bike so long as he does not ride beyond his ability. If all you have driven is a Pinto and you suddenly find yourself in a Corvette, do you immediately get into the thing and punch the hell out of it? If you do, you stand a high chance of becoming a statistic. Same holds true for two wheels.

    Folks. I am adamant, it is not the bike...its the rider that makes the difference. If you (anyone that is) recognize the size, power and weight of this fine piece of equipment, then there should not be any difficulty. If you cannot recognize this, then you should not be riding at all. Regardless, the course should be legislated as mandatory. Even for those who have ridden for years prior to getting the proper license. It will identify bad habits and hopefully correct them before you get hurt
     
  9. FearIsGood

    FearIsGood New Member

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    Amen to that. :team2:
     
  10. Molsan

    Molsan New Member

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    Agreed.
    that said it is an expensive bike.
    also there are abd first bikes.
    the cbr1000rr for example, a wrong flick of the wrist and your in trouble, grab to much break even at reasonable speeds and your in trouble.

    But a 6gen is also my first bike, why get something less when you can get what you want. I like that i don't want other bikes...i like mine.
     
  11. Catholic Damage

    Catholic Damage New Member

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    I must be backwards??
    I lost count on how many bikes I've had, and I'm riding a 1st gen!!!!
    lol.
    Its not the bike, its the rider. You can get into just as much trouble on a Ninja 250 as you can on a VFR if you dont know what youre doing. You can also ride the same.
    Take it easy. Learn yor bike, how it reacts to your driver input, and hw it reacts to the road, and weather.
    You will grow into it, trust me.
    I'm the other way, my last bike had 150rwhp. Tiny touch of throttle, and its on one wheel. Now I'm on a 65rwhp bike, and I actually have to work to get the front end up!!!
     
  12. Molsan

    Molsan New Member

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    Aye but what bike would you rather panik on?
    that 150hp bike probably has touchy breaks to be able to haul that bike down to speed, a panik break responce could be bad, small bikes have smaller more forgiving breaks. Also an inexperianced shift in a corner on a 150hp bike could lead to a wheel spin in a corner and an upset bike.

    The VFR while not ideal is fairly forgiving to these infractions. You miss a shift and have to much gas the bike remains stable, grab to much break and the bike will remain level(mostly don't do it in a corner)
     
  13. Comicus

    Comicus New Member

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    My first bike also

    Last week I purchased my 04 VFR and I love it. This is the first bike i have owned and have not ridden in a few years. Already i feel right at home on this bike.
     
  14. kdfw

    kdfw New Member

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    06 VFR is my 1st bike, too, 7200 miles in 12 months, it's been a blast. As others said, it's the maturity of the rider that decides if this is a suitable 1st bike.

    As for the Ford Pinto, it was my first car and it was a good car (except for buring oil).

    Later,
    Pat
     
  15. PUSkunk

    PUSkunk New Member

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    The pros of the VFR being a first bike are the linked brakes and (possibly) ABS, if you got it. It's also rather stable, not real twitchy. The downsides are the sheer mass, and the expense of fixing it if you drop it. I know everyone over on SBN hates people getting 600s as a first bike, but I recommend a Yamaha FZ6. It's got real predictable, smooth power down low, and is also rather stable (if you don't pull the forks up in the triple clamps, like I did). Downsides are a vague clutch and touchy rear brakes that novices tend to lock up. I'm lucky, I bought the FZ6 totaled, so it was pre-wrecked for me. I started on a 600cc Seca II. Where's my point? Meh, you'll be fine with the VFR, as long as you're big enough to hold it up and respect its' size and power.
     
  16. Big3

    Big3 New Member

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    good luck sounds like you are having fun with it .. keep it safe


    I am in Lancaster Ohio
     
  17. BradleyGrillo

    BradleyGrillo New Member

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    In Maine you have to take the MSF safety course... I took mine on Sunday, got an '86 VFR700F on Monday, and Tuesday I was registered and riding. I haven't had any trouble yet, but I'm taking it pretty slow. Motorcycles are just about the greatest things ever invented...
     
  18. Alaskan

    Alaskan Member

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    Welcome! I like your choice of color. Enjoy the bike.
     
  19. FearIsGood

    FearIsGood New Member

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    [​IMG]

    Well, after the first white-knuckled week I am almost 100% in sync with the bike (almost because I stalled it yesterday). The bike has been very forgiving and my 6'1" frame fits perfectly on it. Oh, and I don't know if I mentioned the prev owner had just put on some Dunlop Qualifiers. These tires seem to be so responsive and I'm sure that's where a huge part of my confidence lies.

    I have now read every review I can turn up on Google and I would just like to ask some of the professionals "what do you think this bike was built FOR? Nevermind the Interceptor legacy, the racing reigns have been handed to the CBR family. Nevermind the previous model and the performance expectations, how powerful does a crossover bike need to be anyway (11.3 qt mile reported by pros)?" So I just shake my head when I'm reading some of them, but the owners always get it just right.

    Long live the interceptor, jack of all trades and master of none. Just how I like it :)
     
  20. Alaskan

    Alaskan Member

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    What was it built for? FUN, of course!


    It also slices and dices. It carries you along I-5 from California to to Washington in total comfort, if that's what you need. It carves through the curves on Hwy 3 in Northern California, too. It can keep you hanging with the supersports. Some people take it to the track.

    It is the best bike I have ever owned.
     
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